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Thread: Proper Grip for FS RIA Tactical - thumb safety...

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  1. #1
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    Proper Grip for FS RIA Tactical - thumb safety...

    Hi All,

    I've finally got enough mags and a holster and took my Rock to a local non-sanctioned USPSA. I had issues with my grip during the shoot that didn't seem to bother me when I was on the range. My normal grip placed my thumb under the safety. I managed to accidentally engage the safety twice during the evening. After that experience, I've found a grip with my thumb on top of the safety. Holding the gun this way, I could never engage the thumb safety by accident and I know that it is off - I have to have it locked and loaded in my holster, after I draw, the thumb safety stays off. The down side is that it feels as though my palm doesn't close tightly on the palm safety, and the mag release is even further out of the way.
    I don't know, maybe I'm adjusting my grip because I'm not familiar with the 1911 safety.
    Anybody else had this problem? Do I stay with what feels like the correct grip and "just don't do that again"? - I haven't had a chance to get back to the range yet.

    thanks,

  2. #2
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    Not all, but most will ride the thumb safety. Some may have a problem disengaging the grip safety with the thumb on the thumb safety. However, for those with that problem they've developed the "speed bump" grip safety. My grip safety doesn't have the "speed bump" and I have no problem with a high thumb grip.

    Here is an NSSF video with Doug Koenig demonstrating the proper grip.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDzC6djUQxM

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by JTQ
    Here is an NSSF video with Doug Koenig demonstrating the proper grip.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDzC6djUQxM
    Correction: That's a video of Doug Koenig demonstrating his preferred grip.

    Ed Brown was a highly competitive shooter in his day. Here's his grip:



    There is no single "proper" grip. The only proper grip is the grip that feels comfortable to you and allows you to shoot well.
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside

  4. #4
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    The RIA Tac has a rather wide ambi safety that, when riding the safety, can also bother you after 150 rounds or so....especially when shooting full house loads.
    I agree with Hawkmoon...whatever is most comfortable.
    I've been kicking around the idea of swapping out the safeties on my Rocks because I ride the safety.
    Beauty is skin deep but ugly goes right to the bone.

  5. #5
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    Hawkmoon wrote,
    Correction: That's a video of Doug Koenig demonstrating his preferred grip.

    Ed Brown was a highly competitive shooter in his day. Here's his grip:
    A valid point. Here Masaad Ayoob explains how he grips a 1911, among other handguns.
    http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/ayoob85.html
    Last edited by JTQ; 1st April 2012 at 17:21.


  6. #6
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    I favor the grip used by Ed Brown and Ayoob. My reason is that my entire focus on shooting a handgun is to prepare for the possibility of self defense. I can't shoot a 1911 with one hand using a "high thumb" grip and, since we have to anticipate having to shoot one-handed when in a self defense situation, for me the notion of practicing two different grips is counter-productive.

    Using the "revolver grip," there is no need to change the strong hand grip when introducing the support hand. It also has the advantage of keeping the strong hand thumb well clear of the thumb safety and locked down.
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside
    Last edited by Hawkmoon; 1st April 2012 at 21:41.


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkmoon
    I favor the grip used by Ed Brown and Ayoob. My reason is that my entire focus on shooting a handgun is to prepare for the possibility of self defense. I can't shoot a 1911 with one hand using a "high thumb" grip and, since we have to anticipate having to shoot one-handed when in a self defense situation, for me the notion of practicing two different grips is counter-productive.

    Using the "revolver grip," there is no need to change the strong hand grip when introducing the support hand. It also has the advantage of keeping the strong hand thumb well clear of the thumb safety and locked down.
    +1 on the revolver grip!
    "Make yourselves sheep and the wolves will eat you." --Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkmoon
    I can't shoot a 1911 with one hand using a "high thumb" grip and, since we have to anticipate having to shoot one-handed when in a self defense situation, for me the notion of practicing two different grips is counter-productive.

    Using the "revolver grip," there is no need to change the strong hand grip when introducing the support hand. It also has the advantage of keeping the strong hand thumb well clear of the thumb safety and locked down.
    While I agree that there is no 'best grip' out there, especially if someone already has a grip he's comfortable with, I don't entirely agree with Hawk's 'two different grips' objection.

    I use a high-thumb hold, simply because it is what I was taught. I started shooting in an IPSC environment, and that's the grip everyone there used and taught. The grip worked for me when using range-rental Glocks, at first, and it felt a lot better later on, when I moved to 1911s and actually had somewhere to rest my right-hand thumb..!

    Two years (and a bit) later, I took part in my first Olympic-style (bullseye) shooting match. Naturally, I extended my right-hand towards the target, with my thumb on the safety. I honestly don't remember if I fired maybe 2-3 rounds that way, but it didn't take me long to figure that the extra space now available under the thumb safety, would be a better place for my thumb. Since then, I shoot low-thumb one-handed, high-thumb two handed. My strong (right) hand doesn't move at all, apart from the thumb itself.

    Therefore, I don't consider these to be two different grips, as far as my right hand is concerned. My right-hand thumb simply moves up and out of the way if my left hand gets anywhere the gun. It is a completely natural movement, that doesn't take any more time to do than my weak (left) hand needs anyway, to get on the gun in the first place.

    Again, I would not describe one or another way as better I certainly have nowhere near enough shooting experience to try and instruct people, let alone get them to change habits that they're accustomed to and which work just fine. I imagine that the last thing you'd want in a defensive shooting situation is worry if your hands will choose 'the old way' or 'the new way', when the time comes.
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  9. #9
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    I use the high thumb grip, like most, if not all top semi-Auto pistol shooters in the uspsa. With a grip that's close to the bore axis, it gives you better recoil recovery for follow up shots. Your support hand thumb pointing towards the target helps with indexing.
    Shooting thumb on safety is no problem with me one handed, strong or weak hand. Takes practice, but really helps a lot

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