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Thread: CZ-75 by KSC (Japan)

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  1. #1
    Join Date
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    CZ-75 by KSC (Japan)

    As I explained in the Browning Hi-Power review a little while ago, my desire for 1911 airsoft models is by now quite satisfied (what, with more than fourteen of them), so I decided that it was time to explore some other alternatives, which I always liked (but was never able to own due to the stupidity of Greek laws).

    One of them was the Hi-Power, the other was the vulnerable, czech pistol, the CZ-75. Unfortunately, the CZ-75 is a very rare model, as far as I could find only KSC offers GBB (Gas Blow Back) models of this pistol in their line.

    These models represent different eras in the development of the CZ-75 pistol.


    This is the first generation version.


    This is the second generation pistol.

    Since I liked the 2nd generation more, I ordered that model.

    A few days later, a large parcel arrived at my home. It contained the Browning Hi-Power (see the review here), a Colt Python (yeap, a 3" one by Tanaka) and the KSC CZ-75.

    KSC is doing a much better job than Western Arms with their packaging. The pistol arrived in a very nice box, with the pistol pictured on the top cover.


    The very nice KSC box in which the CZ-75 is shipped.

    Inside the box, I found the pistol, the usual small bag with the BBs, the documentation and a magazine loading tool.



    The pistol I received was finished in a matte black color, very ... tactical and business-like.





    The pistol looks very real, with the serial number stamped on the slide, the frame and the barrel, while a proof mark can be seen above the extractor at the rear end of the ejection port.





    The sights are plain black with no dots, but they are quite serviceable as far as their height is concerned. The thumb safety moves up and down easily, a bit too easily for my taste, but it works OK, even though the feeling is a bit flimsy.



    The grips are plastic, while the spur hammer showed ... promising sights of hammer bite, as soon as I first pulled the slide to the rear.



    The trigger and the barrel are the only "stainless" parts of this pistol.



    This pistol has an very peculiar magazine. While it is a double-stack one (just like almost every other magazine in the airsoft world) this one remains double-stack all the way to the feeding nozzle.



    In other words, while "Wilson" mags or "Para Ordnance" mags, for the 1911s are double stack in their body but get narrowed to a single BB feeding nozzle, this one looks like a rifle magazine, which remains double-stack up to the feeding point. Actually, the instructions alert you that the top BB you load should be towards the left of the magazine lips, if you want it to feed reliably (the picture above shows the magazine loaded wrong, another BB has to be loaded in it, so that the top one is towards the left). Also, this magazine doesn't include a protrusion that you can pull down in order to facilitate loading the BBs, each BB is inserted on the nozzle, until the magazine is full (23 BBs).

    As I said before, the hammer of the pistol pinched the web of my shooting hand, the first time I pulled the slide to the rear. You can see how the spur hammer overcomes the grip tongue in this picture:



    That's something I hate (being pinched by pistols) so I had to do something. A search for a round hammer proved fruitless and Mike Cripps of Elite Shooting Center told me that he has never seen any round hammer for the KSC CZ-75. So the only alternative was to modify the spur hammer so that it no longer pinches my hand.

    Some work with the dremel and a couple of files, reduced the length of the hammer enough to prevent it from biting. Here is a picture showing how much I trimmed the hammer.



    Here you can see that the hammer no longer touches the frame when cocked by the slide.



    Another thing that bothered me were the grips. They imitate fine the plastic factory grips that come with the CZ-75, but since this pistol would spend more time in the display shelf, than in the yard (my personal shooting range) I wanted it to look perfect. A call to my friend Peter Spielberger, the European General Manager of Hogue Grips resulted in a great-looking set of wooden grips which shortly arrived in my mail box. Thanks Peter, much appreciated.





    The grips were fantastic in the looks department, but they made the pistol a bit too light for my taste. You see, the plastic grips that came with the gun, included two pieces of heavy metal inside, to add some to the overall weight of the pistol. I had to put those weights in the new grips, if I wanted the pistol to be anything near the real one's weight.



    Some work with the dremel created the needed spaces inside the grips and some epoxy glue secured the weights in place. Now the CZ looked and worked like a charm.

    Shooting

    With tall, visible (but unfortunately all black) sights, I was expecting the CZ to be a pleasure to shoot. However, this pistol exhibited the same problem I had with the Tanaka Hi-Power. In other words, the Point of Impact (POI) was much higher than the Point of Aim (POA). Even with the hop-up adjusted all the way down, the BBs still impacted high above the target. I guess that this is due to the propane I use in my pistols, the CZ-75 and the Hi-Power are strictly 134A gas guns. Propane is much stronger than 134A so the BBs fly higher up than they should. I am currently waiting for some .35 gr BBs to see if these can be used to bring the POI closer to the POA. So I ordered some .30 gr and some .35 gr BBs from Mike. With the .35 gr ones, the pistol shoots very close to the POA, and it looks as if the heavier BBs are stabilized better, because this time, I was able to get some 2.5" to 3" groups at 10 m.

    One interesting thing about this model is the fact that its single action trigger is nothing like the real CZ-75 one. I have tried the real pistol several times and all of the samples I've fired, had a "rolling trigger", where you pull the trigger and you can feel the sear dragging on the hammer hooks, and dragging and dragging, and then the shot is fired. Well, the airsoft model had a much nicer trigger, crisp and with no drag, almost like a 1911 one. The double action trigger pull is heavier and has some creep, but in general KSC has done a good work on the trigger front.

    Overall, I am very satisfied with the KSC CZ-75. I know it is not as sturdy as the Western Arms pistols, and it is supposed to be used exclusively with 134A gas, so I am not going to shoot it extensively nor do I expect it to have the power of my 1911s. However, it accurately replicates a pistol I always wanted to have, and with the wooden grips it looks so realm that I consider it a worthwhile addition to by airsoft collection. If only Western Arms could stop producing so many 1911 variations and come out with a couple of other interesting models like the CZ or the Hi-Power!!!!

    Update on shooting

    I just received some .35 gr BBs from Mike, and this seems to solve my issue with the POI being too higher than the POA. At my shooting range (about 10 m), the POI is dead centered now. So for this pistol .35 BBs are to be used.
    John Caradimas SV1CEC
    The M1911 Pistols Organization
    http://www.m1911.org
    Last edited by John; 18th December 2008 at 04:44.


  2. #2
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    Mods

    Very nice work with the Dremel, John. I've had to do some similar Mods on one of my TM 1911s, and I like the way yours turned out. Doesn't look Modded at all, and to me that's the goal!

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Since nobody offers a round hammer for the CZ, I had to be ... inventive. And the dremel did the job just fine, in this case.
    John Caradimas SV1CEC
    The M1911 Pistols Organization
    http://www.m1911.org

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