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Thread: 460 Rowland case gauge

  1. #1
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    Question 460 Rowland case gauge

    The 460 Rowland is basically a longer 45ACP case based on the external dimensions. I've been reloading it off and on for a couple of years now but I have yet to see anyone making a 460 Rowland case gauge. I've also not been able to locate anyone who would produce a custom gauge by basically elongating a 45ACP gauge. All I do now is drop the rounds into my barrel. Yes, that works but it sure would be nice to have a regular loaded round gauge. Anyone have any insight?

    460Rowland1.gif
    Cheers!
    Mark
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  2. #2
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    Sorry, I can't help you with locating a case gauge but I have to ask, what will the case gauge do for you that the barrel chamber won't?

  3. #3
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    In my experience, it will spare him from having to take the gun apart every time he wants to check a batch of ammo.

    I had a 9mm P cartridge gauge recut with the same reamer used on my 9mm Miller Major barrel, but lining up and paying to buy or rent a Rowland reamer just for the gauge would be awful expensive.

    I would either:
    If I had a very good batting average on chamber checks, I would forego checking for ordinary ammo and just plunk the serious stuff for defense or hunting.

    If I wanted full inspection I would drop one in an ACP gauge and let it stick out the .062"; that will swallow it up to the extractor groove anyhow. Then turn it around and poke the case head into the top of the gauge. Most sources of gauge failure I see are either over the bullet or a peened or burred rim.
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    cosh (23rd September 2021)


  4. #4
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    +1 Jim.
    quote = "If I wanted full inspection I would drop one in an ACP gauge and let it stick out the .062"; that will swallow it up to the extractor groove anyhow. Then turn it around and poke the case head into the top of the gauge. Most sources of gauge failure I see are either over the bullet or a peened or burred rim."

    I have used that method. Usually need to make sure the right taper crimp is applied so it feeds well. The 45ACP gauge is a fast check for the crimp and flip around to see if the rim has some issue.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by markthenewf View Post
    The 460 Rowland is basically a longer 45ACP case based on the external dimensions. I've been reloading it off and on for a couple of years now but I have yet to see anyone making a 460 Rowland case gauge. I've also not been able to locate anyone who would produce a custom gauge by basically elongating a 45ACP gauge. All I do now is drop the rounds into my barrel. Yes, that works but it sure would be nice to have a regular loaded round gauge. Anyone have any insight?
    My first insight is that you are looking for a "cartridge" gauge, not a "case" gauge. They are not the same thing, and they do not serve the same purpose.

    You could have any local machine shop with a lathe and a boring bar make one for you.
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside

  6. #6
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    Hello Hawkmoon...I read your post above with interest and I have seen that you have said that before. Could you clarify it and go into a little more depth? I meant to ask before and did not get around to it.

  7. #7
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    I don't know how much more depth is needed, but here goes:

    The OP (markthenewf) has the dimensions for the cartridge. A cartridge gauge is nothing but a chuck of metal that has been bored out and then reamed to the same dimensions as a SAAMI minimum chamber for that cartridge. SAAMI publishes cartridge and chamber dimensions for all SAAMI-accepted cartridges, and those drawings are available on-line. https://saami.org/wp-content/uploads...sting-Copy.pdf

    But SAAMI doesn't have industry-standard dimensions for the .460 Rowland, so the chamber dimensions have to be reverse engineered. A round somewhat comparable in power might be the .45 Winchester Magnum. Looking at the SAAMI sheet for that cartridge, we can see that the chamber is larger than the cartridge by .0047" just forward of the extractor groove; the chamber is larger than the cartridge by .0011" at .033" back from the case mouth; the chamber is larger than the cartridge by .0010" at the case mouth. A .45 ACP chamber is larger than a .45 ACP cartridge by similar amounts. Any competent machine shop could take a block of steel or aluminum and bore it out to the appropriate dimensions. You would just have to work out the dimensions for the leade/freebore.

    And that leads us to the other part of my post, which may be what you were asking about: the difference between a case gauge and a cartridge gauge. The OP called it a case gauge, but then he wrote:

    Quote Originally Posted by markthenewf
    it sure would be nice to have a regular loaded round gauge
    I have some case gauges. Mine are Wilson, like this:

    https://lewilson.com/case-gage

    Pay attention to what the manufacturer says it is intended for:

    • The "Wilson Case Gage" A one piece gage that will check overall length and indicate min/max case length
    • Measures min/max Headspace. Does not measure body diameters
    • This gage is intended to be used with fired cases to determine a basis for full length sizing and case trimming


    In short, these gauges are for checking empty cases to see if they need to be trimmed for length. That's ALL they are. Since they don't check the [case] body diameter, they obviously are not intended for checking loaded rounds to see if they will chamber properly.

    In comparison, a loaded cartridge gauge such as offered by EGW checks the loaded rounds against a bore that has been reamed to SAAMI minimum dimensions to ensure that the loaded cartridge will chamber in any chamber that's within SAAMI (industry) specs.

    https://www.egwguns.com/case-gauge-a...-45-acp-7-hole

    • Our gauges are made to SAAMI miniumum spec.
    • While some companies use boring bars to make chamber checkers, we use the actual Clymer reamers that are used to chamber barrels.
    • Anodized matte black for durability.
    • Measures min case diameter.
    • Measures max overall length.


    Different tools, for different purposes.
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside
    Last edited by Hawkmoon; 24th September 2021 at 18:37.


  8. #8
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    Got it, thanks Hawkmoon! You explained it perfectly and cleared up some misconceptions on my part!

  9. #9
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    "Any competent machine shop could take a block of steel or aluminum and bore it out to the appropriate dimensions."

    I shudder to think what it would cost to have a job shop make a one off version of a $30 gauge.

    "The "Wilson Case Gage"

    The case gauge is offered for rifle cases only. They do make a Case Length Gage in both rifle and pistol sizes.

    "cartridge gauge such as offered by EGW"

    I have the EGW 4-hole gauge with openings for 9mm, .38 Super, .40, and .45. It is very tight and has no leade, it will fail many rounds that Wilson, Lyman, Dillon or gun chamber will accept.

    The Kewl Guys use the Hundo with 100 gauge holes spaced the same as a 100 round plastic ammo box. Drop cartridges in the gauge and if they all go flush, just hold the ammo box over it and invert. A dollar a hole.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Watson View Post
    [I]
    I shudder to think what it would cost to have a job shop make a one off version of a $30 gauge.
    It's not a $30 gauge if nobody sells one for $30.

    I have the EGW 4-hole gauge with openings for 9mm, .38 Super, .40, and .45. It is very tight and has no leade, it will fail many rounds that Wilson, Lyman, Dillon or gun chamber will accept.
    That's because it's made to SAAMI minimum dimensions. If a cartridge will fit in the EGW gauge, it should chamber in any pistol of that caliber. As far as I know, Wilson doesn't offer cartridge (chamber) gauges, only case gauges. Don't know about Lyman or Dillon. I use Wilson for case gauges and EGW for cartridge gauges.
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside
    Last edited by Hawkmoon; 25th September 2021 at 17:58.


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