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Thread: Barrel bushing stresses

  1. #11
    Join Date
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    Having a cracked bushing AND recoil spring plug, strongly suggests that the gun had a stacking recoil spring, at some point.
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter
    Likes (1) :
    Rick McC. (24th May 2020)


  2. #12
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    I agree that is a very real possibility. When I used a spring from a source other than the guns manufacturer, I checked for stacking. However, when I ordered springs from the guns maker, I may not have, I just do not remember. As far as I know, they did not both occur at the same time...although I may have missed the crack in the bushing...it was a very fine and small hairline crack.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spyros View Post
    Having a cracked bushing AND recoil spring plug, strongly suggests that the gun had a stacking recoil spring, at some point.
    If the cracked recoil spring plug was mentioned before, I missed it. Yes, with both of those parts being affected, I would say it's 99.937% probable that the cause was a stacked recoil spring at some point.
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside
    Likes (1) :
    Rick McC. (24th May 2020)


  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkmoon View Post
    If the cracked recoil spring plug was mentioned before, I missed it. Yes, with both of those parts being affected, I would say it's 99.937% probable that the cause was a stacked recoil spring at some point.
    The crack in the plug wasn’t mentioned previously.
    "Sights are for the unenlightened."

    Rick

    IDPA Certified Safety Officer

  5. #15
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    Unless I'm mistaken some years ago somebody (perhaps Tuner) reported a too-long recoil spring caused the front end of a slide to crack off at the parti-circular groove for the bushings locking tab.

    I so, maybe the OP's lucky in the sense that the weak link on this gun was the plug/bushing and not the slide.
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]
    Likes (1) :
    Rick McC. (26th May 2020)


  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by niemi24s View Post
    Unless I'm mistaken some years ago somebody (perhaps Tuner) reported a too-long recoil spring caused the front end of a slide to crack off at the parti-circular groove for the bushings locking tab.

    If so, maybe the OP's lucky in the sense that the weak link on this gun was the plug/bushing and not the slide.
    That’s for sure!
    "Sights are for the unenlightened."

    Rick

    IDPA Certified Safety Officer

  7. #17
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    Broken slides from too-long recoil springs aren't unheard of, but seem to be more common with Officer's ACP pistols and other shorty 1911s.

    Ironically, Colt's original recoil setup in their Officer's ACP drew a lot of criticism because the reverse plug had only a tiny tab at the bottom, securing it to the slide. A too-long recoil spring would break the tab and launch the plug towards the targets. People quickly came up with different setups, using thicker flanges, going most of the way around the plug. Problem solved, right? Well, sure, except now the full stress of the stacking spring is transfered to the front end of the slide. So instead of the plug breaking, it's the slide. Yay...
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spyros View Post
    Broken slides from too-long recoil springs aren't unheard of, but seem to be more common with Officer's ACP pistols and other shorty 1911s.

    Ironically, Colt's original recoil setup in their Officer's ACP drew a lot of criticism because the reverse plug had only a tiny tab at the bottom, securing it to the slide. A too-long recoil spring would break the tab and launch the plug towards the targets. People quickly came up with different setups, using thicker flanges, going most of the way around the plug. Problem solved, right? Well, sure, except now the full stress of the stacking spring is transfered to the front end of the slide. So instead of the plug breaking, it's the slide. Yay...
    Unintended consequences ...

    Someone forgot that one of the principles of system design is to think about a "fuse." The idea of an electrical circuit is to have a cheap, easily replaced part (a fuse) that will fail before something else in the circuit (something more expensive and/or more difficult to replace) sustains damage. In the Officers ACP, we can regard the recoil spring plug as the "fuse" in the recoil system.

    Except that OEM recoil spring plugs for the Officers ACP are no longer available, so we are now pretty much dependent on aftermarket replacements with the flange, such as the one by Clark. One side benefit of Clark's is that the flage is thin enough that you don't have to machine the slide. It thus shortens the slide travel in recoil, which slightly reduces cycle time. I haven't found it to be a problem. The fringe benefit is that the reduced slide travel also provides a slight cushion against the problem of spring stacking.
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside
    Likes (1) :
    Spyros (Yesterday)


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