Welcome to M1911.ORG
The M1911 Pistols Organization Forums Site


Dear members,
Please make sure the email address we have for you, is correct and valid.


Sponsors Panel
If you intend to buy something from the companies advertising above, or near the bottom of our pages, please use their banners in our sites. Whatever you buy from them, using those banners, gives us a small commission, which helps us keep these sites alive. You still pay the normal price, our commission comes from their profit, so you have nothing to lose, while we have something to gain. Your help is appreciated.
If you want to become a sponsor and see your banner in the above panel, click here to contact us.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: lube

  1. #11
    Join Date
    21st September 2008
    Posts
    9,958
    Posts liked by others
    198
    Quote Originally Posted by Pyrenean View Post
    Just a general hint.
    Stihl chainsaw bar oil does a great job on my chainsaws, but yield not to the temptation to put it on 1911 rails. One would think the stuff would thin out when the
    temperature hits 112 F, but noooo..
    Don't ask.
    Heh-heh...

    Chainsaw chains and blades can easily reach over 112C (~234F) when run briskly... that's what that honey-style, oily goo is meant to deal with! A 1911's rails just can't get hot enough for it to be useful. Plus, IIRC it contains stuff in it that is/are meant to keep too much wood-chip mulch staying on the chain, which may or may not be good for gunz and gun finishes..!

    WD-40 is an excellent cleaning product for chainsaws, though.
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter
    Last edited by Spyros; 31st December 2019 at 05:42.


  2. #12
    Join Date
    30th June 2006
    Posts
    43
    Posts liked by others
    12
    Hi,
    First time I've seen this...

    Usually I'm the only one singing the praises of Mobil 1!

    I like the MOLY idea also!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    24th July 2005
    Posts
    396
    Posts liked by others
    19
    I use Breakfree CLP for cleaning and then flush with Gun scrubber.
    I use the CLP for cleaning the inside of the barrel in place of bore solvant if the gun doesn't have much rounds through it.
    For lubing moving parts I use Breakfree LP , it doesn't have the cleaner and is a hair thicker.
    If you can't find the LP , there CLP is fine here too.
    On the outside I use Birchwood Casey Barricade. It goes on as a light mist and then I wipe the excess with a clean soft rag.
    No problems with rust at all.

    I like the fact these products have been around a long time and will be around a few years from now when I need to buy more.
    I like the fact they are easy to find. Brownells, Midway, Walmart, even Amazon.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    6th September 2007
    Location
    NW Florida
    Posts
    1,288
    Posts liked by others
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by T-TAC View Post
    I use Breakfree CLP for cleaning and then flush with Gun scrubber.
    Why do you use a degreaser after you've cleaned the gun?

  5. #15
    Join Date
    16th May 2011
    Posts
    309
    Posts liked by others
    6
    I use Breakfree CLP because I was given 3 gallons of it and I do share with my friends.

    For cleaning the handguns, I use a Hornady Sonic Cleaner (I call it the spa) and the Lyman Steel Gun and Parts solution. I didn't like the Hornady solution.
    MFWIC
    DILLIGAF
    Stercus Accidit
    WTFDTSG

  6. #16
    Join Date
    24th July 2005
    Posts
    396
    Posts liked by others
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by JTQ View Post
    Why do you use a degreaser after you've cleaned the gun?
    The Breakfree CLP cleans the carbon and dirt. The Gunscrubber Flushes that away.
    The CLP is a great cleaner for frames and slides, best to leave it on 10 or 15 minuets to do it's thing, then scrub with a tooth brush.
    Then I'm left with clean , dry metal.
    The Breakfree LP is the actual Lube and is a hair thicker than the CLP.
    But if you can't find LP then the CLP will work fine.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    4th February 2005
    Location
    Milky Way
    Posts
    13,888
    Posts liked by others
    45
    On handguns I've been using a product called 'Weapon Shield' as well as Mobile 1, Slip 2000, and even tried Slide Glide for the rails. After years of lubing guns I am of the opinion that it's more important to properly lube then it is what lube you use. We're lucky to live in a time when we have so many good choices available to us.
    Lynnie, "Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal. "
    - Albert Camus
    Likes (2) :
    Mickey D (Today), Rick McC. (4th July 2020)


  8. #18
    Join Date
    2nd June 2004
    Location
    Terra
    Posts
    21,818
    Posts liked by others
    648
    How do you like Slide Glide?

    I've used Lubri Plate on the rails, figuring that if it's recommended by the U.S. gummint for the M1 Garand it should be good for the M1911A1, as well, but I don't like it in cold weather. I'm leaning more toward any good automotive-grade lithium grease at this point.
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside

  9. #19
    Join Date
    4th February 2005
    Location
    Milky Way
    Posts
    13,888
    Posts liked by others
    45
    I rarely use it anymore. I found I prefer other things for my rails on most guns. The stuff has an odor to it that remind me of transmission fluid and a viscosity similar to vaseline. I tried the light and medium versions. I use Lubriplate on my Garand, M1A and lube my O/U shotguns.
    Lynnie, "Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal. "
    - Albert Camus

  10. #20
    Join Date
    24th July 2005
    Posts
    396
    Posts liked by others
    19
    Joni is right. There are many great brands of lube out there.
    I will add to be careful mixing lubes.
    I once lubed the lockwork of my revolvers with Breakfree, then 6 months later sprayed a shot of Balistol in there.
    4 months later I had a yellow gooey gel, that made them sluggish.
    I had to take the side plates off and flush them with Gunscrubber and relube.

    Also Grease such as Lubriplate have their use, but be careful of the grease drying and getting hard over time.

    I once had two used Colt SP1 ar rifles and could not get the buffer tubes out of the recievers.
    I finally resorted to a torch and oil started seeping into the reciever.
    I figured that whoever put the buffer tubes on put grease on the threads and it hardned to a Loctite over time.

    It can dry on rails, etc. and harden.
    Likes (1) :
    Rick McC. (4th July 2020)


Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Sponsors Panel
If you intend to buy something from Brownells, please use their banners above. Whatever you buy from them, gives us a small commission, which helps us keep these sites alive. You still pay the normal price, our commission comes from their profit, so you have nothing to lose, while we have something to gain. Your help is appreciated.
If you want to become a sponsor and see your banner in the above panel, click here to contact us.

Non-gun-related supporters.
Thank you for visiting our supporters.