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Thread: So who do I think I am? Who cares!!

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  1. #11
    Join Date
    28th January 2006
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    The Great American Desert
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    I would not buy any Kimber that has the Swartz type mechanical firing pin safety in it anymore. It sort of interests me that Kimber has not come out with more models without it like Colt is doing with so many of their new "Series 70" pistols. Or what S&W is doing with their E Series and new Perf Center pistols. Anyway the first Kimber I bought was in 2002. It was a Target Elite II. It was a $740 ouch from a LGS. One of the things that amazed me was the trigger pull. I usually don't even measure trigger pull on one of my Lyman or other gauges till I have put over 200 rounds through a 1911. This time I took it home and it measured about 3.5 lbs as I recall. Maybe light for a carry gun but this guy was a target pistol. Soon after I bought it I got a Kimber 22 conversion unit for it.



    Fast forward and after a couple thousand rounds and I was out shooting it and it doubled on me. I checked it and stopped shooting it. When I took it home the trigger was now a lovely 1.5 lbs. Yes, I could have fixed it. To puff out my chest I have been shooting 1911s for over 50 years (not THAT old as I started when I was 9) and I have owned a couple hundred 1911s over the years. Anyway I dedicated the bottom to 22 conversion units. Not only Kimber, but Ciener and others. One thing of interest is my Colt conversion unit would not fit on the Kimber bottom, meaning it would not even slide on. Not a big deal as I have a number of Gold Cups to put it on. I ended up selling th Target Elite II to a friend. I let him shoot it and the conversion. He bought the pistol for over $800 but did not want the .22 conversion, so still have that.

    Next was a Kimber Grand Raptor in 2005. A very expensive 1911 at about $1.3K in the day. Still very pretty. Not that impressive as far as accuracy goes. The only problem I had with it was the plastic MSH cracked a few years ago. Interesting as I have Colts going back to 1988 with their non metallic MSH and have had no problems. Anyway I ended up replacing it with a SS Wilson MSH which looks very close to the original. The Wilson did take some fitting by the way.



    Anyway this guy stays in my shooty collection since it is such a nice looking pistol and it is the only example of a Kimber with the Swartz type mechanical firing pin safety. Now it also has the external extractor. I have not had problems with mine but I know Kimber went through four variations of it I think before they got it right. Also the shorter than 5inch pistols had more problems as I recall. I know one could send the pistol back and Kimber would replace the slide but for me it is another reason this guy stays in my collection.



    The problems with the external extractor surprised me as it looked a lot like the one Glock uses. Go figure.



    And the last Kimber I bought used. The fellow I bought it from was not even the second owner. Strangely it still had the original box and papers. it is a Stainless Gold Match which Kimber said was made in 2001, so a late model pre Series II. I got to field strip it and put a couple hundred rounds through it before I gave my friend $800 for it. Of course how much of it is original is a good question. The slide has the last three numbers of the serial number. The front sight no. The righty only thumb safety is wonderful, but not sure these came with righty only. I bought some new stocks for it. My friend had put on some double checkered ones which were not flat on the bottom so I ordered some from Kimber. Nice pistol but as I said, not sure how many of the fire control parts are original.



    So two Kimbers at the moment and I will not buy any more Series II anything. If I stumble into another older one at a good price then maybe.
    NRA Life Member

  2. #12
    Join Date
    21st September 2008
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    Interesting collection, and stories. I tend to like firing pin safeties in 1911s (which has A LOT to do with reading Walter J Kuleck's books, detailing his research on the matter) though I much prefer Colt's Series 80 system.
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  3. #13
    Join Date
    9th December 2019
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    Members; (sounds more ďinclusiveĒ than gentlemen) and your call on how much tongue is in my cheek on that last.. if you didnít read my intro Iím a 71, soon to be 72 year old geezer that has also had about all the available manufacturers. Never had a singer though, or even seen one for that matter.. wow shadow, I bet you wish you would have kept that one, Iím not sure what their going for but understand somewhere up in the Ferrari and Lamborghini price range, and Iím more of an old Ford truck driving guy so way out of my price range..for that matter Iíve never had the available ďextraĒ (means the wife wonít yell) cash available to buy a Kimber or Ed Brown etc. I will say Iíve shot friends and all Iíve talked to that own them love them, ďBUTĒ A. Thatís only a total of three so meaningless input, and B. seems like a couple of those guys had feed or extract issues to start with.. Iíve heard that same thing so often that I ask myself, ďselfĒ how does a manufacturer of high end beautiful pistols send out a product that needs immediate work, even if itís as benign as a tune up on the extractor.. why.. I just donít get it.. course Iím sort of an analogue guy living in a digital world, so rock on my son.. that reminds me of a follow up on my rock island, but Iíll put that in the appropriate thread (if I can find it).. God bless

  4. #14
    Join Date
    2nd June 2004
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    Terra
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pistolpadre View Post
    .. if you didn’t read my intro I’m a 71, soon to be 72 year old geezer ...
    Another youngster, in other words (said the old guy in the corner).
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside
    Likes (1) :
    LarryM (23rd July 2020)


  5. #15
    Join Date
    9th December 2019
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    Hawk; Let me oil up the walker, and I’ll meet you over there.. a cup of coffee, and will talk about 1911’s, and maybe a little about Vietnam.. by the way I like your quote, just hate that your a better shot than me..

  6. #16
    Join Date
    13th May 2017
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
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    Thanks for the replies. I posted this because A: It reflects MY opinion about some things, and B: Becuase I wanted to see replies that might tell me if there are some really experienced members that I could trust for input. I am amazed at the number of "Dremel Tool Divas" in many of the sites these days. But I want to say that the replies you've posted, although not always in agreement with what I said, make it obvious that there are some experienced people on here that know what they are doing. I am impressed that I've found you, and hope that I can share thoughts with you occasionally. Merry Christmas Gang!!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    2nd June 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick McC. View Post
    I can work on my own 1911’s, but don’t believe that I should have to to make a new one function reliably.
    I do work on my own 1911s. In fact, I have found that I enjoy tinkering with them as much as I enjoy shooting them -- maybe more (as heretical as that may sound). Few things in life give me more pleasure than taking an old 1911 that someone else has given up on and making it run flawlessly. But I do NOT enjoy paying good money for a brand new firearm and finding that it doesn't run out of the box. Correcting Bubba's tender ministrations is one thing. I should not have to correct problems on a brand new pistol that I just brought home from the gun shop.
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside

  8. #18
    Join Date
    2nd October 2006
    Location
    Weeki Wachee, Fl
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkmoon View Post
    I do work on my own 1911s. In fact, I have found that I enjoy tinkering with them as much as I enjoy shooting them -- maybe more (as heretical as that may sound). Few things in life give me more pleasure than taking an old 1911 that someone else has given up on and making it run flawlessly. But I do NOT enjoy paying good money for a brand new firearm and finding that it doesn't run out of the box. Correcting Bubba's tender ministrations is one thing. I should not have to correct problems on a brand new pistol that I just brought home from the gun shop.
    That’s exactly where I’m coming from, Hawk.

    I enjoy working on 1911s, both my own, and for others.

    I just don’t like the idea that, in addition to for paying for an over-priced brand new one, I’ll need to either work on it to make it run reliably, or follow the manufacturer’s recommended 500 round “break-in,” in hopes that any poorly fitted components will beat themselves into some sort of working order.
    "Sights are for the unenlightened."

    Rick

    IDPA Certified Safety Officer

  9. #19
    Join Date
    2nd June 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick McC. View Post
    I just don’t like the idea that, in addition to for paying for an over-priced brand new one, I’ll need to either work on it to make it run reliably, or follow the manufacturer’s recommended 500 round “break-in,” in hopes that any poorly fitted components will beat themselves into some sort of working order.
    The fanboys for "those brands" like to proclaim that the 500 round "break-in" is necessary because the slides are fitted so tightly to the frame that they need time to lap in for final clearance. In reality, what that's saying is that those manufacturers don't want to expend the time and effort needed to properly lap the slide to the frame. Instead, they expect the buyer to finish their work for them.

    For a contrast, consider a Cabot 1911. I've done the "Cabot Challenge." They show you a bench full of slides and frames, and tell you to pick any slide and put it onto any frame. It doesn't matter which slide or frame you pick -- they fit and mate perfectly. Bone dry, the slide slides like it's on ball bearings. Tip the muzzle end up to about a 30 degree angle, and the slide smoothly runs itself back just by gravity. Yet there is NO vertical play, and NO lateral slop. Cabot pistols are all this way when they leave the shop. They don't expect their customers to spend a quarter to a third of the price of the pistol on "break-in" ammo to finish the manufacturer's job for him.
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside
    Likes (2) :
    PolyKahr (4th January 2020), Rick McC. (21st December 2019)


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