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Thread: Para-Ordnance P-series hammer question

  1. #1
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    Para-Ordnance P-series hammer question

    My ignorance may be showing here. The only series 80 style 1911’s that I’ve ever owned have been Para Ordnance P series pistols, beginning sometime in the mid 1990’s. As I mentioned in another couple of posts, I recently bought a P13 that was made about 14-15 years ago. I have compared this pistol piece by piece with the P13 that I bought about 1994-95, IIRC.
    20181014_213458.jpg20180825_080109.jpg
    The main difference is the hammer hook area (apart from the thumb cock areas of the two hammers), as seen with the hammer on the left side of the picture. Why did Para-Ordnance have this cogwheel appearance in the hammer hook area that is different from Series 70 hammers or even the Series 80 hammers that I am familiar with?
    Last edited by danriverboy; 15th October 2018 at 08:43. Reason: clarify areas of discussion


  2. #2
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    A different means of regulating sear engagement similar to High Standard .22s. I think Behlert used the type on some custom work. If you pin the hammer and sear to the side of the frame you can see how they line up.
    Why? Somebody at PO thought it was a good idea at the time. Better trigger pull without real fitting, maybe.

  3. #3
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    Jim,
    Thank you for your input and knowledge. I certainly don't think that the original hammer yields a better trigger pull--it's okay but definitely not crisp and clean. It's been okay over the years--interesting that I have detailed cleaned this pistol many times, have noticed that the hammer hook region was different, but never thought much about it. (I wonder what else I have missed in life because I wasn't paying attention--hahaha). I always thought that the series 80 safety components were the problem producing some "mushiness". Maybe that's why Para-Ordnance started using series 70/80 hammers in later P-13's.
    Rob

  4. #4
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    Most of the P-O pistols I've owned were the old style with that hammer. To be honest, I wish I had a couple more, to install on my newer P-O pistols. It's very easy to get a very good trigger with that hammer. Just a little light clean-up of the sear and you're pretty much done.

    If you want to swap that hammer for one like the new style hammer in your photo, let me know.
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside

  5. #5
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    Hawkmoon,
    Interesting what you say. Can you describe "a little light clean-up of the sear"? Do you mean that you refine the sear-hammer contact angles? Just knock off the rough spots with a fine ceramic stone? Do you do anything to the hammer itself?
    Rob

  6. #6
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    All I've ever had to do is the sear clean-up described in the article "Poor man's trigger job" in the technical issues area of the M1911.org Home Page site. Basically remove burrs and roughness, and create a small relief angle.
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside

  7. #7
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    I have a P18.9 that I use for competition, that sports this hammer. The trigger pull weight is a beautifully crisp 3.5lbs, and that's with the stock mainspring (21lbs) and the firing pin safety intact. It would have been easy to lighten the pull further (17lb mainsprings are considered the standard among competition friends) but I never saw the need to mess with it any further: it feels great, shoots great and is as reliable as an anvil (and almost as heavy).
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  8. #8
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    I did a little more work on the sear, as you mentioned. And I worked on the portion of the hammer where the sear engages--I think that's where at least a good part of the problem was--it was still a little rough. I'm happy enough with it--I like the fact that the pistol is 99.99% reliable with feeding and ejection.

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