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Thread: What solvent to clean an Ion Bonded 1911?

  1. #1
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    What solvent to clean an Ion Bonded 1911?

    I have an Ion Bond 1911. What solvent can be used to clean it without worry of damage to the finish?

  2. #2
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    I know this is an OLD thread without any answers thus far. I have several Ion Bond 1911's and I have used pretty much anything that I want to clean them--Hoppes, Ed's Red, carb cleaner, etc. So far I am not aware of any problems. I haven't babied them (and I also use Kydex holsters).
    Rob

  3. #3
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    I congfess that I've never had a ion bonded gun, but in the last 40 years I've always cleaned my guns straight after the range, with some Avio then wiped them clean, WB40 and wiped them clean and at the end some BALLISTOL and wiped them clean. In almost 40 years I've never had an issue.
    Sergio
    Anything with a FLGR is fluff, if JMB didn't put it on the 1911 you don't need it.
    Life is too short to shoot ugly polymer guns.

  4. #4
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    I've only used WD-40 on a pistol once, when a stainless gun got wet in the rain. Even then I made sure to degrease it thoroughly after using the 'Water Displacement type 40' spray, before oiling it.

    I do use WD-40 a lot on gardening tools that get wet and filthy, but I generally keep the stuff away from guns.
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  5. #5
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    I have a LW Commander with Ion Bond slide and related parts. I use the same cleaner on that as on everything else - MPro 7 - no issues whatsoever.
    EBK
    "...there's one in every crowd for cryin' out loud, but why was it always turning out to be me?" --- W. Jennings

  6. #6
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    Same annual bugaboo about using WD-40 on guns. If anyone cares to decipher its MSDS you'll find it to be mostly deodorized kerosene and other light petroleum oils - plus the propellant.

    I've got it by the gallon for use in a spray bottle, but mostly what I use on my guns to clean and protect them is #1 off-road diesel fuel - same stuff I burn in my old shop stove. I see no need to pay maybe $5 per ounce for hyped up gun cleaners when 3 per ounce #1 off-road diesel works just as well for me. To each his own, I guess.
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]

  7. #7
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    I'm not going to go into a fight about what's the best type of 'gurgle-gurgle' for use in guns, because as gun debates go, I think it's probably the most pointless one: most stuff is better than good enough, and if you live in a odd place (too cold, too hot, too humid) where something unusual is needed, you probably know it already.

    As for WD-40, being mostly-kerosene or mostly-anything else, doesn't tell us much. A bottle of beer and a bottle of wine can both be said to be 'mostly H2O'. As am I, apparently.

    It's been a while since I last saw the MSDS on WD-40 (probably after another one of these discussions), so I can't be sure but I think it does contain a certain amount of paraffin. Is this a terrible thing? Dunno, IIRC other stuff that's actually sold as gun oils have it, too. But most stuff out there don't have any -- or so I'm told.

    Again, gun oils and scrubbers aren't anywhere near big enough a proportion of my shooting budget for me to care for the cost of the stuff -- especially since my guns really couldn't care less what I clean them with. I've learned that the nickeled stuff don't like Hoppe's No9 but apart from that, most anything goes. So I guess I have too many alternatives to WD-40 for me to care to use it -- even though I probably have four times as many WD-40 spray cans around the house, as all other bottles/cans of gun 'care products' combined -- but that's because our household has an unusual amount of gardening stuff.
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spyros View Post
    As for WD-40, being mostly-kerosene or mostly-anything else, doesn't tell us much. A bottle of beer and a bottle of wine can both be said to be 'mostly H2O'. As am I, apparently.

    It's been a while since I last saw the MSDS on WD-40 (probably after another one of these discussions), so I can't be sure but I think it does contain a certain amount of paraffin. Is this a terrible thing? Dunno, IIRC other stuff that's actually sold as gun oils have it, too. But most stuff out there don't have any -- or so I'm told.
    The problem with using WD-40 is that if you leave it on the gun, the paraffin causes the stuff to congeal. Apply WD-40 to a firearm just before putting it away for long-term (or even intermediate-term) storage, and when you take that firearm out again you'll have a real mess on your hands. It basically turns into varnish.

    WD-40 is not a lubricant, and it is not a preservative. It was formulated as a compound to displace water. It has no place on the shooter's work bench.

    Kerosene (the primary component of WD-40) is hygroscopic, meaning it attracts water. (Which is probably why the stuff works to displace water.) Leave kerosene in a steel fuel container, and it won't be long before said container no longer has a bottom due to rust from the water vapor contained in the kerosene. This does not sound like a substance I want in contact with my firearms. The goal is to prevent rust, not to invite it.
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside
    Last edited by Hawkmoon; 25th March 2019 at 19:31.


  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkmoon View Post
    Kerosene (the primary component of WD-40) is hygroscopic, meaning it attracts water. (Which is probably why the stuff works to displace water.) Leave kerosene in a steel fuel container, and it won't be long before said container no longer has a bottom due to rust from the water vapor contained in the kerosene. This does not sound like a substance I want in contact with my firearms. The goal is to prevent rust, not to invite it.
    Neither kerosene nor any of the other hydrocarbons are hygroscopic. If they were hygroscopic, metallic sodium could not be stored in such things as mineral oil or kerosene without exploding due to contact with the water it had absorbed.

    The reason why a steel can with kerosene can see its bottom develop pinholes and leak is not because the kerosene absorbs water from the air above it. The pinholes are formed because kerosene doesn't absorb water. But because water is more dense than kerosene, any water condensing inside the can will form a layer underneath the kerosene and atop the bottom of the steel can and with time it will rust and form pinholes. You local gas station will (if the owners are conscientious) regularly check for water at the bottoms of their gasoline and diesel fuel tanks by applying an insoluble water indicating paste to a brass plumb bob and lowering it to the bottom of each tank.

    Here's a dose of what I remember from a year or so of Organic Chemistry classes. Many people associate the term "paraffinic hydrocarbon" with paraffin wax, but for fuel oils, kerosene and gasoline that term is an outdated one for alkane. All of those are alkanes - one or more carbon atoms bonded together in a row with hydrogen atoms bonded on at every available place by single atomic bonds. The simplest one is methane gas (one carbon and four hydrogen atoms) and others can have as many as 50 or more carbon atoms hooked together with the general chemical formula of CnH(2n + 2). Gasoline, kerosene and fuel oil are mixture of many different alkanes with perhaps 8 to 25 carbon atoms in each molecule. None are capable of absorbing water and none are capable of being absorbed by water because they are all non-polar molecules.

    In addition, airplane fuel tanks are equipped with drains located at their lowest points so condensed moisture that collects at the bottom of the tanks can be drained out. Failing to do this can cause an airplanes fuel quantity system capacitive probes to malfunction due to contact with the water. For some goofy reason, the aircrews I knew always wanted to know how much fuel remained in the tanks of the airplanes they flew. Woe to the crewchief who neglected to drain the water from the tanks of his or her airplane.

    But I'm perfectly OK with any anybody's abhorrence of WD-40 that displaces water by not absorbing it - but by not absorbing it.
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]
    Last edited by niemi24s; 25th March 2019 at 22:06.


  10. #10
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    Cool

    A few weeks ago I made mention of Ed's Red. If I remember the story correctly, Ed (can't remember his full name) was a gunsmith at Ruger (?) who needed a quick way to clean and lube firearms. He developed Ed's Red, and variations have evolved over time.

    See "http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?258080-Ed-s-Red-Formula" for details and variations of the original formula. I've used this for many years, and a couple of gun parts companies make a great deal of profit from mixing a few cheap solvents (e.g., kerosene) and lubes using this formula and then charging a great deal of $$ for it. After a range session I'll remove the grips, quickly disassemble the frame/slide/barrel, and put the parts into a wire basket. Leave it all in Ed's Red for a few hours to a day or two. Remove the parts and let them drain/dry. A thin coating of lube remains, all that is really needed. You can run a patch down the barrel and wipe off any excess solution/lube. If you want more lube on the rails, a spot of MobilOne 20W50 is my choice. It's cheap when compared to an ounce of some hi cost, brand name grease/oil. And no one has ever proved that their hi price, name brand solvent and/or lube is any better than what I've just discussed.

    Every 4 or 5 range sessions I'll detail strip, clean, and reassemble just to make sure that little if any junk remains on the small parts.

    At Lowes or Home Depot and an autoparts store, maybe even WalMart, you can buy what you need to make Ed's Red--and it's inexpensive when compared to the name brand, hi price solvents and lubes. Mix in an ammo can, and enjoy.

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