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Thread: Slide stop or slide release? Drop or rack the slide?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    6th September 2007
    Location
    NW Florida
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    I agree there is no correct answer though some techniques may be firearm dependent. Though I generally use the slide stop to release the slide on a 1911.

    For instance, I think the current state of trainers recommending (demanding?) the "overhand power stroke" is a Glock thing. As strong and durable as the Glock is, one of the Glock weakest parts is the small, relatively weak, slide stop. Use it a lot to release the slide and it will break sooner rather than later.

    On the other hand, the Beretta 92/M9 has a very prominent and robust slide stop that just begs to be used to release the slide. The Beretta also has a cluttered slide with a safety/decocker lever that could be inadvertently switched to safe by an overhand rack without some care and attention. The SIG P22X series of guns, while having slick slides, also have a very conveniently located slide stop that is so easy to use to drop the slide, it often causes folks to hit it inadvertently keeping the slide from locking back on empty.

    The 1911 is kind of a tweener. It has the slick slide so you don't have to worry about fouling a slide mounted safety, and has a large strong slide stop, that is generally out of the way yet still accessible, that works well for dropping the slide. Use whatever works for you, overhand power stroke, slingshot, slide release, etc.

    One thing I've thought about over the years in the "1911 extended slide stop", "extended mag release", and "scooped grip panel" threads, is perhaps Browning designed the gun with such things that you don't want to inadvertently engage while shooting, such as the slide stop, and mag release to be out of your reach with a firing grip. The things he wanted you to be able to reach, with a shooting grip, were limited to the things you needed to reach, the trigger and the thumb safety.
    Likes (2) :
    John (7th March 2019), MuyModesto (8th March 2019)


  2. #12
    Join Date
    28th September 2008
    Location
    Europe
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    As JTQ said some techniques are "firearm dependent", for instance I've always used the "overhand method" with my GLOCKs and my BERETTAs 98FS, and the slingshot with the 1911s.
    It's true that QUOTE Beretta also has a cluttered slide with a safety/decocker lever that could be inadvertently switched to safe by an overhand rack without some care and attention. UNQUOTE but also in this case is only a matter of training and disengaging the safely lever by habit while pointing the gun is also extremely easy. IMHO

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YExmUVvOqd8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dkGPJ7Mngo
    Sergio
    Anything with a FLGR is fluff, if JMB didn't put it on the 1911 you don't need it.
    Life is too short to shoot ugly guns.
    Last edited by colt45acp; 7th March 2019 at 11:47.


  3. #13
    Join Date
    6th September 2007
    Location
    NW Florida
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    Quote Originally Posted by colt45acp View Post
    It's true that QUOTE Beretta also has a cluttered slide with a safety/decocker lever that could be inadvertently switched to safe by an overhand rack without some care and attention. UNQUOTE but also in this case is only a matter of training ...
    Or to use the slide lock lever...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8LmjakoWKwU

    Just different strokes for different folks.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    6th September 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by colt45acp View Post
    ... I've always used the "overhand method" with my GLOCKs and my BERETTAs 98FS, and the slingshot with the 1911s.
    No right or wrong answer, just wondering why you use the two different techniques and what features of the particular firearms make one easier, or rather preferable, than the other.

    If asked to recommend a technique for those three firearms, I'd probably recommend the overhand for the Glock and 1911, and the slingshot for the Beretta so I could trap the safety lever easier. Just what I'd do.
    Likes (1) :
    colt45acp (8th March 2019)


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