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Thread: reloading dies for dummy rounds

  1. #61
    Join Date
    3rd September 2018
    Location
    Modesto, Ca.
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    13
    Hawkmoon, thanks so much for the tip about the wooden dowel. I used 7/16" diameter which fits well into a .45 ACP case. I used a cheap soft wood dowel, which may or may not have been the best choice. We'll see how that works out over time. I cut the length of each piece to 10.5mm. This allowed my 200gr LSWC slugs to seat well, for an O.A.L. of 31.75mm, which is the same I use for the loads I shoot at the range.

    I very much appreciate your help, and will keep an eye out for your posts on other topics of pertinence.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    3rd September 2018
    Location
    Modesto, Ca.
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    I bought a piece of 7/16" diameter cheap imported dowel, which is a good fit for .45ACP brass. The wood is soft. Dowel with a non-primed case small.jpg For my 200gr LSWC rounds I cut the wood to a thickness of 10.5mm. Dowel visible through flash hole small.jpeg Here's how an assembled case looks with the wood visible through the flash hole.

    The whole point of this is to make dummy rounds that will last through multiple times of being used. So, it'll be a while before I find out just how well this works.
    Last edited by MuyModesto; 15th October 2018 at 16:40. Reason: typo


  3. #63
    Join Date
    21st September 2008
    Posts
    9,637
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    Good. Some shooters fill the primer pocket with a piece of eraser, in case you need to dry-fire your dummy rounds. It won't last forever (or nearly so), but for occasional use it should do.
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  4. #64
    Join Date
    3rd September 2018
    Location
    Modesto, Ca.
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    Interesting idea. I only use the dummy rounds by mixing them with live rounds. Currently I use the ratio of 1 dummy for every 2 live ones. I put them in a can and mix them up. Then, while looking away and using only sense of touch I load my magazines. That way I have no idea where the dummy rounds are in the mix. So far I've noticed my trigger control and my scores are improving dramatically using this method. In that context I have two questions:

    1) Is the eraser in the primer pocket needed? My understanding had always been that it was OK in centerfire guns to dry-fire with nothing there to stop the firing pin's motion. Such would not be the case with rimfire guns. I always keep one 1911 unloaded and locked up separately from the others - - unloaded. It's always the one going with me to the range on my next range day. I dry fire it every day. After range day I rotate that assignment to the next one.

    2) What would be a good adhesive to keep the erasers in place with all the motions of recoil and the heat generated by the firing of the live rounds in the mix?

    I'm glad I joined this forum. I'm picking up a lot of really good information here.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    2nd December 2004
    Posts
    501
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    Quote Originally Posted by niemi24s View Post
    Don't worry about that bulge and don't try to get rid of it.

    There are two types of crimping dies:

    Roll crimp dies are for use with bullets having a crimping groove. These are required for use in revolvers to keep the bullet from working out forward and tying up the cylinder. Here's what they look like:

    http://

    Taper crimp dies are for use with bullets lacking a crimping groove such as those bullets for the 1911. These dies don't crimp the case mouth into the bullet. They merely remove any remaining case mouth flare when used properly.

    Here's a photo of both types:

    http://
    That is a very steep taper crimp die.

    You should think of taper crimp as more like a 'eliminate the slight flare' die.
    The case should be pretty much straight at that point.

    Note that carbide dies for .45 ACP almost all use a single narrow rin of carbide.
    Any slight taper that was present in the case is going to be mostly eliminated.

    The mouth is crimped smaller than required to make sure it will have suitable neck tension when a bullet is forced in.

    This means the rest of the shell is treated as a straight sided case and made the same diameter as far down the case as the carbide ring can reach.

    Older carbide dies often had a ring that stuck out a small distance past the face of the die.
    Letting the ring strike the face of the shell holder resulted in a cracked ring and a wrecked die.

    Most of the newer ones seem to have made sure the carbide ring is at least slightly behind the face of the die.
    The steel of the die body hits the shell holder before the recessed carbide ring does.

    Fewer cracked carbide tings should occur now.

    But always check a carbide die to see if the carbide ring is proud of the die face or slightly recessed.

    If it is proud of the die body NEVER let that die actually strike the shall holder face.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    25th September 2006
    Location
    South of Lake Superior
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    Quote Originally Posted by brickeyee View Post
    The mouth is crimped smaller than required to make sure it will have suitable neck tension when a bullet is forced in.
    Whoa! You're saying the case mouth is crimped BEFORE the bullet is seated into the case?

    Or did you mean to say the case mouth is sized and flared before the bullet is seated into the case?

    Or maybe you're confusing a carbide sizing die with a Lee Carbide Factory Crimp Die?
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]
    Last edited by niemi24s; 24th October 2018 at 15:41.


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