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Thread: Electronic Scale question

  1. #31
    Join Date
    16th January 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkmoon View Post
    Reading this discussion makes me very happy that I long ago abandoned my electronic scale and reverted to the mechanical beam scale.
    I am fortunate. I never drank the electronic scale Kool-aid.

    Or maybe I am just cheap.
    Last edited by coalgeo; 27th June 2017 at 21:19.


  2. #32
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    2nd December 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by niemi24s View Post
    Note that the scale in the video has a resolution (smallest displayed amount) of 0.001g or 1 mg. This equates mathematically to 0.0154 grains, so when set to grains that scale probably has a resolution of 0.02 grains. This is about 5X finer than the usual reloaders scale selling for perhaps US$50 to US$200. The scale in the video has a retail price of US$449 at Scales Galore: https://www.scalesgalore.com/product...id=25480#chart This is a very sensitive scale, more sensitive than needed by all but the most finicky reloader.

    The digital scales most of us have are not nearly this sensitive and usually have resolutions of 0.01g and 0.1 grain - perfectly OK for our purposes. Being less sensitive they are less likely to have reading excursions like shown in the video - remember, that last digit you see jumping around is not even present on our run-of-the-mill digital scales when set to Grams.

    My little el-cheapo Frankford Arsenal scale does jump a bit when I wave my cell phone around it, but is a little more affected by a fluorescent light with standard ballast. Test yours to see what you have that can cause unstable readings.
    Actual accuracy (precision) is not the same as resolution.

    That scale is NOT going to tell you with any kind of reliability 1 mg.

  3. #33
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    2nd December 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by coalgeo View Post
    I am fortunate. I never drank the electronic scale Kool-aid.

    Or maybe I am just cheap.
    They are good for sorting things.
    That is all I ever use mine for.

    I worked for many years on precision metrology electronics.

    It is as much art as science and engineering.

    We use circuits that rely on the ratio of components as much as possible.

    t the end of the day you still need to have a very stable reference though.

    We generally used frequency for the stable known quantity.

    There are numerous painfully precise signals available.

    We had equipment that would take days to settle to its final absolute accuracy.

    We produced crystal oscillator 'constellations' (groups) that had phase noise that took months to verify.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    25th September 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by brickeyee View Post
    Actual accuracy (precision) is not the same as resolution.
    And accuracy is not the same as precision, as you seem to believe. Accuracy, precision and resolution are three separate things.

    • Accuracy is how close the measurement is to the actual value
    • Precision is how repeatable the measurement is.
    • Resolution is the smallest displayed increment of the measurement.
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by niemi24s View Post
    And accuracy is not the same as precision, as you seem to believe. Accuracy, precision and resolution are three separate things.

    • Accuracy is how close the measurement is to the actual value
    • Precision is how repeatable the measurement is.
    • Resolution is the smallest displayed increment of the measurement.
    Sorry for using vernacular.

    I know they are not the same, thus the reason for often stating both.

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