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Thread: Electronic Scale question

  1. #21
    Join Date
    2nd June 2007
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    My first electronic scale was purchased in the late '70s and still works. It worked for decades under fluorescent lights with no problems. My ChargeMaster and Lyman 1500 work under fluorescent lights without issue.
    When I have a problem, I call the manufacturer right away. Most electronics have problems within the first months or they almost never have problems.
    The biggest issue I have ever had are breezes and overhead fans, and that is taken care of with a breeze shield that most scales should come with.
    NRA Life Member

  2. #22
    Join Date
    3rd February 2007
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    Tennessee
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    My electronic scale from RCBS does a good job but I frequently verify its accuracy with weights from my old scale.

  3. #23
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    29th January 2017
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    Pact Precision and Gempro 250 both plugged into the same outlet on a duplex adapter. Also my fluorescent old 4 ft overhead light is plugged into the same outlet. Both scales are on a bench separated from my press bench. I think that is key to have the scale NOT on the bench with your press. Vibration is not good. I have no problems with the light, electrical problems or other interference. My air condition vents are on the opposite side of the ceiling. The only time I have any issues is in the winter when I've been reloading for a long time and the temperature drops a few degrees downstairs. Thermostat is upstairs in my bi-level home. Not an issue though as just hitting the tare function and it's good to go. TV mounted on a wall to the left of the scales higher and about 4 ft. left of them. No problems. Can't imagine why some complain about their electronic scales not being accurate or won't stay calibrated? Also, my two scales are checked with Scale Check Weights most times I start loading. My Pact Precision trickles perfectly. My Gempro 250 does not trickle well. It seems to hang on a number then jumps to the higher proper weight. I sometimes trickle a weight, turn around, then when I read the display again it has jumped higher. May just be my Gempro? The Gempro is very accurate and reads to the second decimal. I load with my cell phone on my belt often no problem. I read some have problems with a circuit with a washing machine or other appliance on the same circuit? I highly recommend putting your scale on a separate bench or sturdy table to avoid vibration. Avoid vibrating your electronic scale. Wouldn't load without one and my RCBS 5-10 balance beam has been in a drawer since 1994-95.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    2nd December 2004
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    "I sometimes trickle a weight, turn around, then when I read the display again it has jumped higher. May just be my Gempro?"

    The circuitry and possibly even SW used to try and compensate for sensor shifts is not responding to the very small changes.
    It 'smooths them out' as noise unti lthey are larger than the system will tolerate.

    Strain gauges are relatively high impedance/resistance devices.

    This makes for a noisier signal that must be smoothed to obtain a stable display.
    The signal is averaged over a period of time to find its 'actual' value.

    Making the display be accurate, sensitive, and stable is often a trial end error process during design.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    11th April 2009
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    Tyrone, GA
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    Always, always check your digital scale with a balance scale. Sorry!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    25th September 2006
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    Hi Slice38: to the Foyum!
    Quote Originally Posted by slice38 View Post
    . . . check your digital scale with a balance scale.
    Testing both with check weights is much better. Both scales could be off by the same amount and you'd falsely conclude both are accurate - when in actuality they could both be inaccurate by the same amount.
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]
    Last edited by niemi24s; 23rd May 2017 at 21:40.


  7. #27
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    2nd June 2007
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    >. . . check your digital scale with a balance scale.

    Yet, NO lab I have worked in or visited in 50 years has a beam scale ANY WHERE.
    Even drug cartels have given up on beam scales.
    NRA Life Member

  8. #28
    Join Date
    25th September 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by noylj View Post
    >. . . check your digital scale with a balance scale.

    Yet, NO lab I have worked in or visited in 50 years has a beam scale ANY WHERE.
    Even drug cartels have given up on beam scales.
    By this, are you saying the calibration of an electronic digital scale should only be checked with another electronic digital scale?
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]

  9. #29
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    2nd June 2007
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    You don't "calibrate" a tool by using another of the same tool. You can compare, but not calibrate. In our case, we have no idea which is the more accurate or "correct" scale.
    You calibrate a scale by using certified check weights.
    Back in the olden days, even beam scales got calibrated by the metrology dept. every year or so--and it wasn't by using another scale. You can take your check weights and plot "actual" weight vs. scale reading.
    NRA Life Member

  10. #30
    Join Date
    2nd December 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by noylj View Post
    You don't "calibrate" a tool by using another of the same tool. You can compare, but not calibrate. In our case, we have no idea which is the more accurate or "correct" scale.
    You calibrate a scale by using certified check weights.
    Back in the olden days, even beam scales got calibrated by the metrology dept. every year or so--and it wasn't by using another scale. You can take your check weights and plot "actual" weight vs. scale reading.
    It is possible to use a set of three devices to determine the accuracy of the members.

    Optical flats have long been manufactured as sets of three.

    Precision frequency measurements are made by comparing three separate source in a 'round Robbin' fashion.

    It is a real to set up and do these types of measurements.

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