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Thread: Coated bullet question

  1. #21
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    25th September 2006
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    If the H&G 130 was the bullet that seated easily in Post #15, you've got no problem with case grip.

    If it's not the bullet of Post #15.....
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]

  2. #22
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    2nd January 2016
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    Niemi,

    It is indeed the same bullet...if you would please expound on why the 130 is grippy, I am curious.

    You got me started on that mold and I love it. My little Kimber just gobbles em up.

  3. #23
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    With an H&G 130 cast bullet, the only things I can think of that give it such good case grip are:

    • The bullet material is hard enough to resist being reduced in diameter during seating
    • The bullet OD is large enough after being sized and lubed to stretch out the case enough for a good case grip on the bullet.

    I don't think the pattern of the bullet nose has anything to do with it, but I don't what affect the polymer bullet lube has.
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]

  4. #24
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    2nd January 2016
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    The Missouri bullets are bhn12 and bad man is bhn 15.

    There has not been any appearance, measurements or accuracy indications of deformation.

    I'm up to 200 rds through the gun and so far am really sold on the coating..I'll give it a few hundred more before final judgement, been excited before when it took awhile for the real character of something to show up.

  5. #25
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    Just remembered there's another thing that can make bullet seating effort easy or a bit hard: Case wall thickness. Thin brass or even thick brass with thin areas stretches easily and gives little resistance to seating. Uniformly thick brass is difficult for the bullet to stretch and so resists bullet seating and thus has a good grip on the bullet. Here's a chart showing case wall thicknesses:

    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/156zIbMxWvocfbIzzh5VIuozv6QPjj7fDVe0OaewvidM/edit#gid=0
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]
    Last edited by niemi24s; 25th February 2017 at 19:35.


  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by NuJudge View Post
    I had trouble with both 50% Alox 2138F/50% Beeswax lube, and with Lee Liquid Alox building up in my seating die. The fix for me was Dillon seating dies, which allow one to disassemble them for cleaning without losing adjustment.
    If you carefully measure and record lengths most dies can be disassembled and reassembled to the same adjustment.

  7. #27
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    2nd January 2016
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    My Top Brass and Starline both measure at .011-.012 thick walls.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    28th September 2016
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    I use powder coating. It acts just like a jacket but with a clean bore afterwards.

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