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Thread: Remington R1 Models

  1. #31
    Join Date
    28th September 2008
    Location
    On other side of the Atlantic
    Posts
    426
    Posts liked by others
    38
    Welcome to our 1911 forum.

    Apart from cleaning and lubing a gun after every use, how did you store it during the last two years?
    I enclose for your knowledge some interesting reading about the care and cleaning of firearms.

    The care and cleaning of firearms differs slightly from shooting models because of the special characteristics of the precious metal finish normally applied to a collectible model. "Tender Loving care" is required to maintain the original beauty and luster of the finish and, also, preserve the firearm to a 'like new" condition indefinitely. Moisture and fingerprints are the enemy we must guard against. The frequency of cleaning will depend on your climate and storage conditions. I recommend at least two cleanings per year (i.e., every six months) or after each handling of the firearm prior to storage. Marring and scratching the finish adversely effects its value and, thus, I recommend the following on the maintenance of collectible firearms:
    DO remove fingerprints and protect the finish with a light coat of preservative oil on blued firearms using one of several reputable aerosol sprays now being marketed. Be sure to read and follow all manufacturers directions and warnings before using any aerosol product.
    DO use a non-abrasive silver or gold polish to remove fingerprints, smudges, and tarnish from all plated surfaces. We use "Flitz" metal polish, marketed by Flitz International Ltd., 821 Mohr Avenue, Waterford, WI. 53185. The polish should be used with a very soft flannel cloth or jewelers cloth made especially for this purpose. Be sure to read and follow all manufacturers directions and warnings before using any polishing product.
    DO apply a very light coat of preservative oil in the barrel bore using an aluminum or brass cleaning rod with flannel patch.
    DO display the firearm in its display case for short periods of time, such as gun shows, etc., after wiping off any oil or substance which may stain the case lining.
    DO remove any heavy oil residue accumulated from long periods of storage from the firearm with lacquer thinner and a soft flannel cloth or a soft artist's brush. This solvent will not damage precious metal surfaces, but the stocks should be removed, as it may damage the stock finish. After cleaning with this solvent, a very light coat of preservative should be applied. Care should be taken not to let the lacquer thinner come in contact with the internal mechanism, as it will dissolve any lubrication. CAUTION: Lacquer thinner is an extremely flammable solvent and the manufacturers directions should be carefully followed.
    DON'T cock Single Action or Double Action revolver hammers or function automatic slides, as they may cause friction marks and scratches, unless cleaning is necessary. A visual check between the cylinder and frame will determine if a Double Action or Single Action model is loaded. With automatic models, remove the magazine, and carefully retract the slide just enough to insure an empty chamber.
    DON'T store firearms in holsters, presentation cases, soft gun cases, socks, or any material which may absorb moisture.
    DON'T use the presentation case as a shipping container when transporting or shipping your firearm.
    DON'T use abrasive polishes, cloths, or steel wool to restore the luster of precious metal plating.
    DON'T disassemble the firearm for routine cleaning.
    DONíT use excessive oil, which will accumulate dust, etc., or allow oil to contact wood stocks.
    DON'T use a steel brush or rod to clean barrel bore or cylinder chambers. In stubborn cases, a brass brush can be used, but a bristle brush is preferred. Do Not reverse brush direction, if avoidable.
    DON'T assume a new-in-box (NIB) gun will stay that way without periodic cleaning and lubrication.
    DON'T use nitro bore cleaning solvents on plated surfaces, as damage will result, especially to soft precious metal plating.
    DONíT handle the firearm, especially the metal surfaces, with your hands anymore than absolutely necessary, as fingerprints and smudges will eventually become corrosive.
    In summation, collectible firearms will retain their original finish, if properly maintained at regular intervals. The frequency of maintenance care will vary depending on individual storage conditions, but good common sense will always prevail. Don't allow stains, fingerprints, and tarnish to become corrosive. Should your gun develop finish deterioration, don't become overzealous in attacking the trouble spots, but contact the manufacturer for recommendations.

    Sergio
    Before you start collecting 1911s .... buy books! Don't collect something that you'll be forever making excuses for, be careful not to get drawn to a piece that is not original, and buy the gun not the story.
    Last edited by colt45acp; 12th April 2017 at 02:29.


  2. #32
    Join Date
    21st September 2008
    Posts
    9,474
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    73
    Quote Originally Posted by Ulises415 View Post
    I dont know if you guys can help, but i bought a Remington 1911 R1 roughly 2 years ago and when i bought it the the Finish on the front of grip was wearing out, thats how i got it at a reduced price but that is besides the point, right now my gun has rust on that part. And i was woundering is there a way to prevent rusting or from it coming back
    Cold-blueing the affected area would help stop the rust returning, but first you have to remove it. If it's not too deep, rubbing it with CLP might be all you need to achieve that.
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  3. #33
    Join Date
    11th April 2017
    Posts
    2
    Posts liked by others
    0
    I store it in my drawer since i use it from time to time and its my night stand gun. Also i do maintain and clean it since i do take it camping. Also the finish that was worn down when i bought it has worn down to bare metal i guess thats why it shows rust from time to time

  4. #34
    Join Date
    25th August 2009
    Posts
    12
    Posts liked by others
    0
    all of the storage and care issues aside....
    I purchased an R1 commander as a base gun intending to have some modification fun. After a handful of range trips, I concluded it shot so accurately, reliably, there was no logic in working it over. It now serves as my daily carry and nightstand gun.
    So, the gun has been too good in a way. I am back to the gun shops for that base gun!

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