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Thread: Replacement Recoil Spring for the 1911R1

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  1. #1
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    Replacement Recoil Spring for the 1911R1

    According to email received from Remington technical support, a 16# recoil spring is recommended when a replacement is warranted.

    That being said, after feeding my 1911R1S about 3200 rounds of ball, I bought a Wolff 16# conventional recoil spring.

    I did notice, however, that it takes considerably more effort to rack the slide.

    Should this ease up by virtue of the fact that the pistol is stored in battery?

    The picture below shows the old springs in the top row, versus the new ones on the bottom.

    20131226_124908 - Copy.jpg

    Thanks,

    John
    It is said that God is always on the side of the heaviest battalions. -Voltaire

    Remington 1911R1S - Beretta Nano BU09

  2. #2
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    For giggles, see what happens if you put the new spring in the gun, assemble normally, leave it like that (in battery) for 4-5 days, then fieldstrip and compare its free length with the old spring, which will have spent those 4-5 days uncompressed.

    Also, whenever you put a new recoil spring, you need to check it for binding, i.e. make sure that the slide can still go all the way to the rear before the spring stacks to a solid tube. To do this, first use the old spring (or no spring at all), pull back the slide and mark how far it goes onto the frame (a regular pencil should help) then assemble with the new spring and repeat. If the slide doesn't go back far enough, you'll need to cut coils off the new spring. If this is the case, cut only half a coil at a time between checks -- and be careful, the piece being cut will likely fly off rather briskly...
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  3. #3
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    Would it be advisable to cut the number of coils to match the original spring?
    It is said that God is always on the side of the heaviest battalions. -Voltaire

    Remington 1911R1S - Beretta Nano BU09

  4. #4
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    No it would not. First, we don't know if the wire gauge is the same. And second, even if it were, we don't know if the metal has the same heat-treating, etc... or even what steel alloy it is.
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  5. #5
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    The Wolff spring is the superior product. Install it and check for binding. Replace it after 3500 rounds. Enjoy.
    "Make yourselves sheep and the wolves will eat you." --Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790)

  6. #6
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    11B, I am in agreement, having fired 104 rounds of Remington-UMC ball this morning. Any concerns of binding were without merit, as I had no issues.

    The only thing different was felt recoil, it felt a little muted when compared to the original spring. It was a welcome change, though I had to relearn how the gun felt in my hand when I made it go boom.
    It is said that God is always on the side of the heaviest battalions. -Voltaire

    Remington 1911R1S - Beretta Nano BU09

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by u35828 View Post
    11B, I am in agreement, having fired 104 rounds of Remington-UMC ball this morning. Any concerns of binding were without merit, as I had no issues.
    Sir, with respect... yes, there's a better than 50% chance that you're right and have nothing to worry about. But if you're wrong, it could take much longer than 100 rounds before the consequences of spring binding rear their ugly head. If you have it, best case scenario, the spring will break first. Worst case, the bottom legs of your barrel bushing snap off and fly forward, along with the recoil spring plug.

    Checking for binding takes all of 5 minutes, taking it real easy.
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  8. #8
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    Thanks for that tip; I found a primer on this site (as well as YouTube) on how to check for recoil spring binding. Performing said test showed no binding condition existed with the replacement part.
    It is said that God is always on the side of the heaviest battalions. -Voltaire

    Remington 1911R1S - Beretta Nano BU09

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