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Thread: Set up and shot of the full moon

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  1. #11
    Join Date
    29th May 2004
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    Practically no atmosphere (hence no humidity), but with lots of dust and lots of radiation from the sun? I am not sure I would be interested in one of these babies.
    John Caradimas SV1CEC
    The M1911 Pistols Organization
    http://www.m1911.org

  2. #12
    Join Date
    21st September 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by John
    Practically no atmosphere (hence no humidity), but with lots of dust and lots of radiation from the sun?
    It depends.

    If they left them in a box of some sort, then even if the outside of the box is in direct sunlight, the inside, with no atmosphere, will be cold. So unless the box received a direct hit from a meteorite, they should still be brand-sparkling new.

    IIRC, the Apollo12 astronauts landed very close to an unmanned NASA probe, which had landed on the moon about 18 months earlier. They dismounted a camera from the probe and took it back home with them. Not only was the camera OK on arrival to earth, but on the inside of its casing, scientists found the remnants of a cold bug/virus, from when a technician sneezed in the room while the thing was being assembled, before the probe was launched!

    So even if the cameras had been left exposed, I wouldn't discount the possibility that they're still OK. 18 months is a lot less than 40+ years, but in the vacuum of space... who knows?
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

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