Welcome to M1911.ORG
The M1911 Pistols Organization Forums Site

Happy Easter
to all those who celebrate it.


Sponsors Panel
Ruger
If you intend to buy something from Brownells, please use their banners in our sites. Whatever you buy from them, gives us a small commission, which helps us keep these sites alive. You still pay the normal price, our commission comes from their profit, so you have nothing to lose, while we have something to gain. Your help is appreciated.
If you want to become a sponsor and see your banner in the above panel, click here to contact us.

Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Hammer strut pin installation

THREAD CLOSED
This is an old thread. You can't post a reply in it. It is left here for historical reasons.Why don't you create a new thread instead?
  1. #1

    Hammer strut pin installation

    Would like to get an advice if there is a special precaution on installing the hammer strut pin on the hammer strut and hammer.

    I just bought those GI parts above and want to install it, but would have to put them together first.

    TIA.
    If you want to survive...then you must be built for the KILL!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    25th September 2006
    Location
    South of Lake Superior
    Posts
    12,873
    Other than orienting the strut properly (so it's arched toward the "front"), the only other things relate to how well the pin fits its hole in the hammer:

    The pin might be 0.001" smaller than its hole in which case it should be LocTited in place or given a slight bend to prevent its loss

    If the pin & hole are average size, the pin should be a light press fit and stay in place.

    The pin could be 0.001" bigger than the hole, taking some effort to press in. If it's really a hard press fit, I'd either find a smaller pin or shim the "slop space" between the strut and slot with feeler stock so the pressing effort can't pinch the sides of the hammer together.

    Regards
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]

  3. #3
    niemi24s, great advise. I will have to use either one of these when the parts have arrived. Hopefully I won't encounter major issues installing it.
    Thanks.
    If you want to survive...then you must be built for the KILL!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    24th April 2005
    Location
    Bowling Green, KY
    Posts
    324
    My advice is to stake the pin. Once you have it in place, make sure its even on both sides. Then, while laying the side of the hammer/pin on a flat, steel surface, place the tip of a center-punch in the middle of the pin and strike it HARD with a good hammer. This is called staking; it will cause the metal around the strike to displace and will fill the pin hole better.
    Once you've staked it in place check again to make sure it's even on both sides; if need be lightly stone (or sand using very fine paper) the side of the hammer/pin area to ensure there will be no drag in the frame, and you're done! A proper hammer strut installation that will not work its way out and add drag to the action.

    Good luck!
    Chad D. Cassetty
    KY Concealed Carry Instructor, NRA Endowment Member
    NROI Level I Range Officer / USPSA

  5. #5
    Join Date
    2nd October 2006
    Location
    Weeki Wachee, Fl
    Posts
    4,894
    My Harrison Design strut pin was a VERY tight fit in the HD hammer.

    I felt no staking was neccessary; as that pin isn't going anywhere.

    FYI:
    With the Kimber hammer and strut that were being replaced; their strut pin was staked near the edge, not centered, so that a bit of the pin metal extruded out to the side.

    Seems to me that would be a better way to go than staking the pin in the center.

    Take care,

    Rick

  6. #6
    So which is much preferable to use for staking, a regular pin-punch or a center punch?
    If you want to survive...then you must be built for the KILL!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    24th April 2005
    Location
    Bowling Green, KY
    Posts
    324
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick McC.
    I felt no staking was neccessary; as that pin isn't going anywhere.
    This can absolutely be the case. If hammering it in has it secure, there's little to be gained by staking. All you're really after is to prevent the pin from walking to either side and introducing drag by contacting the frame.


    Quote Originally Posted by Rick McC.
    their strut pin was staked near the edge, not centered, so that a bit of the pin metal extruded out to the side. Seems to me that would be a better way to go than staking the pin in the center.
    I can see where that would displace a large amount of material in one spot and make the stake job quicker, but I personally prefer to center it; the material is displaced more evenly around the pin end and in the hammer's pin hole. I seriously doubt any ill effects would arise from non-centered staking; it's not likely to crack for example.
    I'm not saying that my way is the ONLY or BEST way; it's just how I was taught and how I've been doing it for years, but that doesn't mean there's not a better way!

    Quote Originally Posted by ybrik
    So which is much preferable to use for staking, a regular pin-punch or a center punch?
    You'll definitely need to use a center punch. A regular punch will be flat-faced; you're after one with a pointed tip like this example:



    Good luck!
    Chad D. Cassetty
    KY Concealed Carry Instructor, NRA Endowment Member
    NROI Level I Range Officer / USPSA

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Sponsors Panel
If you intend to buy something from Brownells, Sinclair or Police Store, please use their banners above. Whatever you buy from them, gives us a small commission, which helps us keep these sites alive. You still pay the normal price, our commission comes from their profit, so you have nothing to lose, while we have something to gain. Your help is appreciated.
If you want to become a sponsor and see your banner in the above panel, click here to contact us.

Non-gun-related supporters.
Thank you for visiting our supporters.