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Thread: Remington 1911A1

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  1. #1

    Remington 1911A1

    Pleased to finally show off my first 1911A1. I've been following this forum for a while, almost as long as I've been searching for a WWII .45. Being fairly local to the Ilion, NY Rem plant, and a longtime Rem fan, I recently purchased a new 1911R1 for my first .45. I decided my collection would never be complete without a matching Rem A1 to go with the R1. So, this is the one I found.... Did the best I could, quickly learned I don't know beans about close-up photography. Although it was pretty dry, I did find a bit of excess oil under grips and internals, wiped down best I could but unfortunately what I smeared around probably messed up some photos. Think I did OK with this purchase, but always willing to hear opinions from the experts. I can try for better photos if anyone wants something specific.






















  2. #2
    Join Date
    29th May 2004
    Location
    Athens, Greece, Earth
    Posts
    27,382
    Blog Entries
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    Good work finding this pistol. Congrats.
    John Caradimas SV1CEC
    The M1911 Pistols Organization
    http://www.m1911.org

  3. #3
    Thanks John.
    Any advice on cleaning and oiling? I have searched the forum, found references to Clenzoil (sp?). May be purchasing some soon.
    I have been using RemOil for quite a while on all my guns, but have no desire to reinvent the wheel if others have good experience with something else.
    My biggest concern is damaging the parkerized finish.

    Regarding the finish, what is reccomended for removing built-up residue, mainly excess oil? I have read where over rubbing can polish the finish? My first instinct was to reach for the hoppes solvent, but figured I better hold off for some advice. Mainly in the hard to reach places, under the grips etc...

    I would pretty much consider this a safe queen for me. Might not be a 99% finish Singer, but its probably going to be my only one. Have plenty of shooters, this one will only need some fingerprints wiped down once in a while. Well, maybe quite often, but shouldn't need many thorough cleanings. Want to make sure I'm using the best stuff that will do the best job preserving it.

  4. #4
    remington rand is not the same company as remington arms. The ww1 era remington umc would have been a sibsidiary of remington arms that did make the 1911. Remnigton rand made typewriters and associated business machines prior to the 1911 cotract.

  5. #5
    Agreed MajorD, not technically the same company, but they are at least cousins.

    Eli Remington founded the firearms business during the 1800's in Ilion, NY. At some point he got into the typewriter business, which was later was sold off and became known as Remington Rand, I suppose Rand might be the name of the guy who bought it? It was this sold off business that got the contract to build WWII 1911A1's. Shortly after the war, Remington Rand became Sperry Rand, and later UNISYS (I looked this part up). One could argue that todays Remington Arms is barely related to E. Remington & sons, many corporate shifts have transpired over the years, like most companies I suppose.

    So, I agree todays Remington Arms is not the exact company, or even the same plant, that produced 1911A1's. But like I said, I'm a Rem fan, so they're close enough for me.

    Interesting to me is why Remington UMC, a subsidiary of Remington, did not build 1911's during WWII, after they had in WWI?

    I suppose now I'll have to find a WWI Rem UMC to complete the collection

  6. #6
    Remington was founded in 1816. In 1873 they started making Remington Brand typewriters, and in 1886 they sold the typewriter business. That business would later become Remington Rand. In 1888 Remington was purchased by a company that also owned Union Metallic Cartridge. In 1912 the two companies were combined to form Remington UMC.

    Remington UMC only produced the 1911 model.

    Remington Rand only produced the 1911A1 model.

    Remington UMC didn't produce the 1911A1 during WWII because they were busy overseeing production of ammunition and other weapon systems.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    29th May 2004
    Location
    Athens, Greece, Earth
    Posts
    27,382
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by mackey
    Any advice on cleaning and oiling? I have searched the forum, found references to Clenzoil (sp?). May be purchasing some soon.
    I have been using RemOil for quite a while on all my guns, but have no desire to reinvent the wheel if others have good experience with something else.
    My biggest concern is damaging the parkerized finish.

    Regarding the finish, what is reccomended for removing built-up residue, mainly excess oil? I have read where over rubbing can polish the finish? My first instinct was to reach for the hoppes solvent, but figured I better hold off for some advice. Mainly in the hard to reach places, under the grips etc...

    While I never had a parkerized pistol, I would suggest the followings (after putting on my flaming suit).

    For cleaning, I always trusted Hoppe's No 9. Never used anything else in my life.

    For lubing, on external surfaces, for corrosion protection, I would suggest any good gun oil, SLIP2000 is something I've used and was pretty satisfied, but any gun oil should do. Alternatively, a good motor oil, like Mobil 1 (or whatever) will do as well. The parkerized finish means that there are pores on the surface. These pores should be "filled" with oil, in order to prevent corrosion of the metal underneath. So I would use a small container filled with the oil and submerge the slide and frame in it for some hours, in order to fill those pores with oil. Remove the parts, and let them stay for some hours, so that excess oil comes to the surface. Then wipe them out well and you are done.

    For the internal mechanism, the last few years, I trust Gun Butter. It's a great lubricant, which stays put, where you apply it and does an excellent job of lubricating moving parts. Apply it per the lubricating instructions found somewhere in this site, as you assemble the pistol. Work the action several times, wipe any excessive oil that comes out of the matting surfaces and you are good to go.

    Don't trust some urban legends which suggest to bake the pistol with vaseline etc. Vaseline doesn't have any rust-protecting properties, if you want to follow a ... baking procedure, use a good grease instead, with clearly described anti-rust properties.
    John Caradimas SV1CEC
    The M1911 Pistols Organization
    http://www.m1911.org
    Last edited by John; 27th May 2011 at 01:43.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    16th January 2005
    Location
    Uniontown,Oh.
    Posts
    626
    2nd that on John's advice..CLP has always worked for me.LOVE that Hoppe's #9 smell,plus it's works good,also..
    "Carry the battle to them.Don't let them bring it to you.Put them on the defensive and don't ever apologize for anything"-Harry S. Truman

  9. #9
    Beautiful!!
    USN Hospital Corpsman '82-'91
    1943 Remington Rand M1911A1
    1945 Remington Rand M1911A1

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