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Thread: .45 ACP Wolf steel cases and steel bullets...

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    20th May 2005
    Location
    Republic of TEXAS
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    4,176

    .45 ACP Wolf steel cases and steel bullets...

    I had bought 500 rounds (19 Jan) just for something to shoot in the woods and not have to watch where the cases went..shoot and forget them.

    The bullets look like any other 230 gr RN copper. When I saw the bimetal description, a thought occurred, are they copper plated steel????? And yes, my magnet confirmed they are magnetic.

    http://www.wolfammo.com/index.php?op...id=2&Itemid=13

    The rounds function 100% and I don't see any of the dirtiness some have mentioned. I have yet to recover any bullets to see if the core is lead.
    Johnny

    Resident Septuagenarian and teaching five grandchildren about safety and shooting.
    FTFeed or FTFire and FTEject or FTExtract, please
    Sent from my keyboard using hunt-n-peck...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    25th September 2006
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    Just as a guess, I'd say the bullets had a lead core and the magnetism was in the jacket. That's because steel is only about 70% as dense as lead and if the entire 230gr bullet (except for the jacketing) was steel it would need to be about 30% larger in volume. But, I suppose, that extra 30% could be on the back of the bullet and down inside the case.

    Sounds like Miller...er.... bullet puller & hacksaw time!

    Cheers
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]

  3. #3
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    25th September 2006
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    Found this http://forum.pafoa.org/general-2/540...f-bullets.html where some poster said it was the jacket that was magnetic, but no details were given. and did give some details including pix (which I didn't look at).
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]
    Last edited by niemi24s; 22nd April 2010 at 13:01.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    20th May 2005
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    I didn't look at the pix either...have to register to view. The description given tells me it's a lead core...

    Good find niemi.....
    Johnny

    Resident Septuagenarian and teaching five grandchildren about safety and shooting.
    FTFeed or FTFire and FTEject or FTExtract, please
    Sent from my keyboard using hunt-n-peck...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    20th May 2005
    Location
    Republic of TEXAS
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    4,176
    Found this;

    "Steel-jacketed bullets

    Not only the cases of Wolf rifle ammo are steel. Most of Wolf's rifle cartridges use steel jacketed bullets, though they look like copper jacketed. The copper exterior of the bullet is only about .005 inch thick, (about twice the thickness of a sheet of paper) with a steel jacket underneath about 1/32 inch thick. Only the cartridges in the yellow and black boxes have real copper jackets. The core of the steel jacketeted bullets, sometimes marked "bimetal", are lead. Some rifle ranges have started magnet testing shooter's ammunition to determine if bullets are steel jacketed. The steel is said to be more likely to ricochet, and also to cause sparks on impact, which can be a problem when shooting in dry grassland, or forest areas. In addition, a large majority of pistol ranges will not allow shooters to use Wolf, or other Russian ammunition types because of the steel jacket components on many of their products. The reason cited for this is because they claim it damages the backstops."

    From;

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolf_Am...cketed_bullets

    And this is interesting;

    Tests have shown that steel-cased Wolf cases do not obturate sufficiently to form a good gas seal against the chamber [2] when compared to brass-cased ammunition. As a result, when Wolf cartridges are fired, some of the combustion by-products are deposited between the case and the chamber, causing a build up of carbon that is well in excess of normal. Firing a brass case (that does expand fully) after using Wolf ammunition can result in the brass case being "glued" into the chamber by the carbon buildup. This issue has nothing to do with the lacquer coating vaporising or melting, as has mistakenly been suggested. The problem is one of carbon deposition, which creates the same end result i.e. a stuck cartridge that has jammed in the chamber. It is important to emphasise that Wolf ammunition is perfectly safe to use because it conforms to all SAAMI standards. However, it is recommended that firearms are thoroughly cleaned after using Wolf ammunition due to the increased rate of carbon build-up within the chamber. Most users are content to accept increased rates of gun cleaning in return for being able to purchase more ammunition per dollar. As mentioned in the previous paragraph, the looser chamber dimensions of Soviet designed weapons allow for more room during firing and extraction. Soviet or East Bloc weapons do not experience these problems.

    Note: all ammunition currently manufactured by Wolf has polymer-coated or brass cartridge cases and any obturation problems have been radically reduced.
    Johnny

    Resident Septuagenarian and teaching five grandchildren about safety and shooting.
    FTFeed or FTFire and FTEject or FTExtract, please
    Sent from my keyboard using hunt-n-peck...

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by niemi24s

    Sounds like Miller...er.... bullet puller & hacksaw time!

    Cheers
    I beg to differ.........................with your label preference!!!

    Ron
    Distinguished Service Pistol, Bullseye Master

  7. #7
    Join Date
    28th December 2006
    Location
    North East Ohio
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    5,713
    Quote Originally Posted by Pappy
    As a result, when Wolf cartridges are fired, some of the combustion by-products are deposited between the case and the chamber, causing a build up of carbon that is well in excess of normal.


    maybe that's why I found it to be so dirty.
    I only shot a mag or two of my friend's Wolf ammo.
    I'm pretty sure it was older stuff too

    and on the opposite of that, maybe it's why I find Blazer Brass to be one of the cleanest.
    It's the thinnest brass case


    ..L.T.A.
    Last edited by Cap; 22nd April 2010 at 18:48.


  8. #8

    Wolf 45 Corrosion

    Two years ago I purchased plastic sealed packs of Wolf 45 ACP. I never opened the plastic pack and stored them in my cellar. I opened them when I noticed a liquid forming in the packs. The bullet cases were all corroded and I had to dispose of them. The cases were pock marked and the bullets themselves were messed up.
    Has anyone see this happen?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    20th May 2005
    Location
    Republic of TEXAS
    Posts
    4,176
    Welcome to the Forum gatman.

    No, I have never seen this happen on Wolf or any other brand.

    Sometimes very, very old powder that has been subjected to high heat and humidity will decompose. Did you notice any odor?

    FWIW, the powder will get weaker.
    Johnny

    Resident Septuagenarian and teaching five grandchildren about safety and shooting.
    FTFeed or FTFire and FTEject or FTExtract, please
    Sent from my keyboard using hunt-n-peck...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    25th March 2005
    Location
    Western Kentucky
    Posts
    362
    I just checked some Wolf with a magnet, both the new style polymer, and one old style lacquered case I had hanging around.

    Neither jacket was magnetic. Both bullets look exactly like any other .45 230 grain full metal jacket that I have ever seen.

    There may be some steel jacketed Wolf out there, but I haven't seen it.

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