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Thread: Fitting/Tuning the EGW Ejector

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  1. #1

    Fitting/Tuning the EGW Ejector

    I'm in the process of fitting the EGW extended ejector in my Caspian build. I have to admit that ejector tuning is the most bewildering part of 1911 work for me. Everything else with the 1911 seems like straight forward science, but the ejector seems like voodoo.

    First of all, the EGW ejector is oversized in almost every dimension and required extensive fitting to the slide. At least it dropped right into the frame holes, though.

    After fitting it to the slide, I cut the nose back enough to ensure that it would eject a live round without getting caught up. I also ensured that the top round in the magazine would not hit the bottom of the ejector at any point during feeding.

    Now onto the voodoo.

    I've seen every variation of ejector nose shaping I can imagine - angling it backward and forward and even compound angles. I've also seen it beveled on the inside edge, the top inside corner, and toward the ejection port. I've also seen the top of it rounded off.

    My question is what is a good starting point? How should I shape it before test firing? I'm suspicious that ejector tuning is one of those counter-intuitive things, and what I would do to influence ejection in one way would actually produce the opposite result.

    Is hand cycling with empty brass a good indicator of ejection patterns when live firing, or does it not help at all?

    Help please and thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    23rd September 2008
    Location
    Tampa Florida
    Posts
    2,465
    Hello,

    The only experience that I can share is: If the ejector profile extends foreward into the magwell area watch out for interference with new round in the magazine. My New Agent ejector was scratching deep grooves into the bullet casings because of this and I needed to round off the bottom of the ejector to fix it.

    Rgds
    Eric

  3. #3
    Join Date
    25th September 2006
    Location
    South of Lake Superior
    Posts
    13,060
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom in Ohio
    . . .the ejector seems like voodoo.
    Seemed that way to me too when installing my first extended ejector so the first thing I did was make a sacrificial ejector from brass stock to experiment with. Some pix of it are in this thread: http://forum.m1911.org/showthread.ph...mental+ejector

    A lttle later in another thread, 1911 Tuner and I got together and this was his pet ejector nose profile as shown in Post #11 here: http://forum.m1911.org/showthread.ph...r+Observations

    My personal ejector nose philosophy (!) is based on assumed rotations of the case about the ejector nose and the variability of the extracted case's vertical position:

    As viewed from the left side, the nose is shaped "/_" to have the first contact point as low as possible on the case head. It's angled back enough to maintain that same contact point until the case mouth rotates upward and the top of the case head makes first contact with the breechface.

    At this point in time, the case angle is momentarily fixed by four-point contact with the extractor, breechface, left hand breechface guide block and ejector. Then the ejector begins to move the case rim forward along the left hand breech face guide block.

    As viewed from the top, the nose shape is also "/_" to maintain the same contact point as the case rotates clockwise in the horizontal plane.

    When the case rim gets slid far enough forward along the left hand breechface guide block, it loses contact with it. At this instant, the extractor gives the case head a little kick to the left and the case is on its way to becoming free of the extractor and out of the ejection port.

    At least that's how I envision the ejection process and why my ejector got shaped that way. Be nice to have a high speed video of it to see how close to reality I got.

    I guess a good starting point would be perfectly square for a sacrificial brass ejector or the way it comes for a new store-bought ejector. I couldn't tell much from hand-cycling, so with the brass one I'd take a few file strokes, step out the shop door and shoot a few rounds to see what changed. Then, back inside, file-file, back outside, bang-bang , etc, etc.

    Hope this is understandable and helps a little.

    Regards
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    16th January 2005
    Location
    Uniontown,Oh.
    Posts
    626
    Why does everyone want/need extended ejectors?My 'normal' one works fine even with an unaltered ejection port(not lowered or anything)?
    "Carry the battle to them.Don't let them bring it to you.Put them on the defensive and don't ever apologize for anything"-Harry S. Truman

  5. #5
    For one, the extended ejectors give you more material to work with if you need to tune things. If you do something wrong, you have material to cut it back and start fresh.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    25th September 2006
    Location
    South of Lake Superior
    Posts
    13,060
    Quote Originally Posted by jwenum
    Why does everyone want/need extended ejectors?
    Everyone doesn't. But the folks (like me) who shoot NRA Bullseye with WC ammo having velocities in the 700fps region find extended ejectors get the spent cases clear of the ejection port will a lot more zip.

    This prevents stoppages - always a good thing.

    Regards
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]

  7. #7
    I have two Colts that would on a regular basis send the empties bouncing off my head, glasses, etc...I didn't like that.

    Both had extended ejectors put in and problem solved. Most 1911's that aren't "GI" style have extended ejectors for that reason.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    18th May 2009
    Location
    Fresno, CA.
    Posts
    732
    I have been messing with my Norinco 1911A1 range gun (test mule) and thought this information might be helpful.

    The Norinco has a lower ejection port than my 1927 Colt-Hartford Argentine, but a similar, short ejector. The Norinco has the EGW FPS, a 16.0lb recoil spring and a 25.0lb mainspring. The stock extractor was tensioned in the usual fashion, holding a loaded cartridge until shaken quite vigorously.

    In this condition, the Nornico would eject 'lazily' with casings coming out of the gun about level with the shooter's right shoulder and dropping next to the shooters right foot. Every few rounds would hit the shooter in the forehead. By comparison, my 1927 Colt-Hartford Argentine, with the exact same configuration, will send empty brass 3 feet behind and 3 feet right of the shooter's right foot.

    When I looked at the ejectors on the two guns, side-by-side, I noticed a big difference.

    The 1927 ejector had an approximate 45 angle, starting at the vertical transition of the ejector and extending upwards. When viewed from the top facing forward, the ejector has a slight angle towards the right.

    The Norinco had a very 'short' angled area, less than 1/2 the length of the contact face of the ejector and a very steep angle of about 15 to 20 by my calibrated eyeballs.

    I took a hard Arkanasa stone and began to re-shape the nose of the ejector to match the one in my 1927 Colt-Hartford Argentine. When finished, I inked the nose of the ejector and hand-cycled a magazine full of dummy cartridges through the action.

    Inspection revealed the right hand edge (looking down into the ejection port towards the front of the gun) of the ejector angle is contacting the cartridge cases. The contact is even and extends all the way from the upper tip to the vertical transition.

    I'm not sure if this is an optimum contact pattern, but we will be doing some range testing later this afternoon and I will post the results.

    I invite any comments on this topic...Robert

  9. #9
    Join Date
    18th May 2009
    Location
    Fresno, CA.
    Posts
    732
    Interesting....

    Major changes to ejector angle, as detailed above, but little change to ejection pattern. No stoppages, but empty brass is landing around my right foot with a few thrown forward for good measure..:-)

    FP strike is well centered, the cases do not contact the ejection port and there are no gouges or burrs on the fired brass.

    Thoughts????....Robert
    Last edited by 10851Man; 1st February 2010 at 19:59.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    9th December 2008
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    1,197
    My thought is: sounds perfect!

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