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Thread: Trigger Job

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  1. #1

    Trigger Job

    What does it take to lighten up trigger pull from 4.5 lbs. to 3.5 lbs.?
    This on a series 80 Colt GCNM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    19th October 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    328
    The range in possibilities are from 15 minutes and no money to several hundred dollars.

    Bend the left leaf of the sear spring to reduce the pressure on the sear.

    and go from there....

  3. #3
    Join Date
    25th June 2006
    Location
    Carlisle PA, USA
    Posts
    12,044
    Hi

    Trigger pull on a 1911 is a combination of things. It's best to understand the way it all comes together before you start fiddling things. Check out the "poor man's trigger job" section over in the tech area for a good overview.

    More or less:

    You need to take a bit off of each of the sources of "pressure" rather than just do one. Springs, sear surfaces, and geometry all need to be "tweaked".

    If you want a good trigger in addition to one that's just light - you also need to clean up various parts like the frame and trigger edges.

    If you want a trigger that's safe as well as light and good - you need to be *very* careful about what you do. 4.5 pounds is pretty good for a 1911 trigger. Going much below that can lead to issues.

    If this is a carry pistol, think twice about doing this. If it's a target / range only pistol do it with care...

    Bob

  4. #4
    THank you, guys. Points well taken.

  5. #5
    I have one at 54 ounces of pull. It is very crisp. The sear angle was set on a jig, all parts cleaned up and stoned, and THEN, the takeup weight was adjusted, then the sear spring was finally set to apply just enough weight to be safe under all conditions. All of this done with the ILS still left in place on a Springfield with stock parts. I make note of that because if you read a lot of the boards, a great trigger cannot be had with the ILS mainspring and MIM parts. This is absolutely the lightest that I would want it.

    I have a custom RIFLE that I have a trigger that breaks at 24 ounces. Everyone I let try it dry always has a moment when they lay their finger on it. Of course, this is after telling them not to "rest" their finger on it. I apply my finger to it and then just tighten the muscles in my hand ever so slightly, allowing me to put round after round into the same hole at 100yds. So far I have put 5 into one ragged hole .58". That is a .308.

    My point is, don't go getting such a light trigger that it is not safe for you. If you don't shoot at least three times a week to get accustomed to a light trigger job, and most importantly SAFE, then you shouldn't go down below about 4-4.5 lbs. I actually am considering going up on my rifle trigger to about 40 ounces for safety considerations.

    When I get a little time, I plan on fixing up my Combat Elite's trigger to be a lot crisper, it is pretty mushy compared to my Springfield, not to mention a little heavier. The weight is not so much of a problem, but I need to set the overtravel and the sear angle properly.
    Last edited by eng208; 5th April 2009 at 21:17.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    25th June 2006
    Location
    Carlisle PA, USA
    Posts
    12,044
    Hi

    I have a 22 target rifle that's got a sub one pound trigger on it. I have taken it out a few times to demonstrate the problem of light triggers to people. Even when you tell them it's a light trigger, they still have trouble with it. I have never had a person pick it up and shoot better with it than with a "normal" 22 on their first magazine through the rifle.

    A 1911 trigger is a very simple thing. There's not a lot of "crazy parts" in there. Either each part does what it should, or you are in trouble. The hammer / sear interface is critical. Smoke / blue / ink the sear and hammer surfaces to check engagement - it't the only way to do it and be safe.

    Bob

  7. #7
    NRA/Bullseye regs allow down to 3.5 lbs. no less and that is what I'd like aside from a crisp trigger. The main rule is to keep the trigger moving as target acquisition is reestablished. My S&W PC1911 was ordered set up as a wadcutter gun and came with a 56 oz. trigger pull and I'd like to have my Colt NMGC the same way. Maybe, I'll just shut up and save for smithy fees and just let them do all the work on the Colt. Thanks for all those tips,guys.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    25th June 2006
    Location
    Carlisle PA, USA
    Posts
    12,044
    Hi

    Don't let me scare you off from working on your pistol.

    People should work on their own triggers. Everything on a 1911 is "do-able" if you take your time and have the right tools. The point is to do it right, and to expect it to take some time. In the case of a sear / hammer replacement you will need a jig and some stones to do it right. None of that is rocket science. It's just not a drop in. A drop in is something like a new recoil spring, a new MSH or new stocks.

    Bob

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by pa_guns
    Hi

    Don't let me scare you off from working on your pistol.

    People should work on their own triggers. Everything on a 1911 is "do-able" if you take your time and have the right tools. The point is to do it right, and to expect it to take some time. In the case of a sear / hammer replacement you will need a jig and some stones to do it right. None of that is rocket science. It's just not a drop in. A drop in is something like a new recoil spring, a new MSH or new stocks.

    Bob
    Excellent advice Bob.

  10. #10
    There is a source for a trigger group who offered to jig set up everything I need for a nominal fee before shipping the lot to me, I think I'll go that way. At the risk of being dinged be the moderators; dare I mention the source? Fusion Fire Arms. Ooops! It slipped out. Anyhow, can anyone tell me anything about this company?

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