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Thread: Mag Primer use with .45 ACP reloading

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by noylj View Post
    Why would you EVER reduce 20%, when start loads are just 10% of max loads?
    Why? Simple, provided a little common sense is used. And for two reasons. Here's why.

    #1: If the load you're using is, say, 5.0 grains of powder, a 2% reduction from 5.0 grains is a mere 5.0 X 0.02 = 0.1 grain. This means your reduced load is only 5.0 - 0.1 = 4.9 grains. And given that nearly all standard powder scales have a resolution of 0.1 grain and a stated accuracy of 0.1 grain it's a bit of a stretch to imagine someone "working their way up from 4.9 to 5.0 grains".

    #2: Furthermore, your broad-brush statement that "start loads are just 10% of max loads" (emphasis mine) is woefully mis-stated as you no doubt meant to write "start loads are just 10% less than max loads". A load that is a mere "10% of max" would probably see the bullet stuck in the barrel, as shown below:



    In addition, it fails to recognize the wide variety of load data from both bullet, bullet mold and powder manufacturers. While a good many start loads are about 10% below the maximum, some are 20% below maximum. Yes, 20%. And if you don't believe that 20% figure, you don't have enough load load data for the 45 Auto cartridge.

    Sorry, but your 2% rule of thumb fails miserably for 45 Auto loads.

    Regards
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]
    Last edited by niemi24s; 1st August 2017 at 14:26.


  2. #12
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    With the very fast powders usually used in a .45 ACP it is not likely to have much affect.

  3. #13
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    How about with a 45 Auto load using a much slower powder?
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by niemi24s View Post
    How about with a 45 Auto load using a much slower powder?
    Why are you using a slower powder in a .45 ACP?

    The short barrel makes it all but useless in a 1911 style gun.


    If you have a longer barreled gun then a slower powder would likely prove useful and a magnum primer would likely result in some increase in pressure.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by brickeyee View Post
    Why are you using a slower powder in a .45 ACP?
    I'm not using a slower powder. All I use is Bullseye which is, I think, a fairly fast powder. But a quick glance at some load data turns up loads using Blue Dot and AA-No.7 which seem to be a fair amount slower than Bullseye at about 1/3 of the way down some burn rate charts.

    I guess it's safe to assume those two powders are not too slow for the 45 Auto cartridge in a 5" barrel, but I guess the big question is "How low is too slow?" Maybe when there's no published load data for it for the 1911?
    When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. [Lord Kelvin]

  6. #16
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    Just a note in case someone forgot:
    The powder that produces the highest velocity with an 18" barrel will produce the highest velocity with a 2" barrel.
    Now, that isn't to say that one might produce a higher muzzle pressure that could effect accuracy, but on strictly a velocity worry, the slower will always produce a higher velocity for the same peak pressure.
    Because the combustion chamber determines the burn rate functionality, you can't efficiently use H322 in your .357 Mag carbine, even if you want your rifle to use rifle powders...
    NRA Life Member

  7. #17
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    Interesting read here, thanks all.

    From a novice reloader.
    "Where is the wisdom that we have lost in knowledge?" T.S. Elliot
    Dominus Vobiscum . . . <))>(

  8. #18
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    Bottom line is, "It just depends". Stay away from +P data, drop down 10% using published load data and the OP should be good to go with CCI 350 primers. Chronograph results between CCI 350 and WLP primers is very low, if any, and depending on powder, one might see a decrease in extreme spreads. I don't use any powder that doesn't fill at least 50% of the case, it's another added safety precaution. During the last reloading component shortage, there were a number of primer/powder combinations that worked very well, you may even find a lower extreme spread with some loads using CCI 350 primers.
    NRA Life Member since '67

    "Never interrupt your enemy when he's making a mistake."
    Napoleon

  9. #19
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    My esperience, going from srp in 9mm to srpm didn't change anything - same brass, powder and powder charge and bullet. If you are not loading a maximum load, I'd just load a few up and chrono both and see if there is any difference in your own case. Also same result in small primer .45 ACP, going from standard to magnum small rifle primers didn't make any real difference.

  10. #20
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    I've been using LP Magnum primers in my 45 ACP Bullseye loads for years. No high pressure problems using 4.5 gr. of Bullseye powder under a 200 gr. SWC.

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