Welcome to M1911.ORG
The M1911 Pistols Organization Forums Site


Sponsors Panel
If you intend to buy something from Brownells, Cabela's, TandemKros or Tekmat, please use their banners in our sites. Whatever you buy from them, gives us a small commission, which helps us keep these sites alive. You still pay the normal price, our commission comes from their profit, so you have nothing to lose, while we have something to gain. Also, don't forget to visit our other sponsors sites, click-throughs are appreciated by our advertisers. Your help is appreciated.
If you want to become a sponsor and see your banner in the above panel, click here to contact us.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 30 of 30

Thread: When buying aftermarket parts are there any parts that should be replaced together?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    10th March 2017
    Posts
    25
    Posts liked by others
    2
    Thanks for the info

  2. #22
    Join Date
    2nd December 2004
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    511
    Posts liked by others
    3
    Commander hammer and grip safety. As in real Commander (1967 alloy frame):



    -- Chuck

  3. #23
    Join Date
    21st September 2008
    Posts
    9,422
    Posts liked by others
    65
    Sadly this one isn't available any more. The safety, that is. But if someone really wants one, they can Dremel off the rear end of a current one.

    I say 'current'... actually the 1991 Commander that last had the longer one isn't catalogued any more, either.
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  4. #24
    Join Date
    2nd June 2004
    Location
    Terra
    Posts
    20,474
    Posts liked by others
    131
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck S View Post
    Commander hammer and grip safety. As in real Commander (1967 alloy frame):



    -- Chuck
    I forgot about the early Colt Commander grip safeties. The profile is very different from that of the GI grip safety, though, and the only place I have ever seen one of the early Commander grip safeties for sale was an ancient vendor at a huge gun show in York, Pennsylvania, at least ten years ago. I tried grinding down a GI grip safety to replicate the Commander style but it didn't come out very well.

    As far as I know, nobody sells that type today.
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside

  5. #25
    Join Date
    25th September 2011
    Posts
    580
    Posts liked by others
    25
    It appears that Numerich has some in stock. https://www.gunpartscorp.com/Products/723590.htm
    Reason: fixed link


  6. #26
    Join Date
    21st September 2008
    Posts
    9,422
    Posts liked by others
    65
    Yes, that's the one!
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  7. #27
    Join Date
    20th March 2017
    Posts
    13
    Posts liked by others
    1
    The left grip and right grip? Think of it this way: most of the parts effect at least 1 other part AND have at least 2 functions (there is a few exceptions). There are a few parts that will appear to function check just fine but if not fitted correctly (regardless of material and quality) will not last long. Yes, the pre-WW2 models were hand fitted snugly (tightly in some cases), hand polished where applicable for optimum function. The fitting was particular enough that the parts had last of ser number stamped (and yes, they function great)..... The reputation for being loose is from ww2 on but that's another story

  8. #28
    Join Date
    20th March 2017
    Posts
    13
    Posts liked by others
    1
    There is more than a few 1911 manufacturer​ companies that learned the hard way there is no such thing as a drop in part even when using the best parts available. There is certain fitting checks that must be done and function tests to produce a reliable working unit (even when making their own parts to their own tolerances!) That being said, if you have a quality build drop in parts will usually work.... but for example the sear: it must interface correctly with the hammer hooks (flatly, for the primary and secondary angle), it must allow for proper disco function, allow the thumb safety to properly engage, interface with "half cock notch"..... Then what if one of the frame holes for hammer and sear were slightly off from the factory? In a factory build it would (probably) be compensated for with the parts you just pulled out. A real smith would have no problem getting optimum, long term function by ensuring your drop in part is fully functional.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    29th March 2007
    Location
    At home
    Posts
    167
    Posts liked by others
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by 1911A2
    Yes, the pre-WW2 models were hand fitted snugly (tightly in some cases), hand polished where applicable for optimum function. The fitting was particular enough that the parts had last of ser number stamped (and yes, they function great)..... The reputation for being loose is from ww2 on but that's another story
    The M1911 was designed and generally built as a military firearm for which one of the primary requirements was that all parts had to be interchangeable. I have never before encountered the notion that prior to WW2 Colts were hand fitted and hand polished. Can you provide some documentation to support this assertion?

    Quote Originally Posted by 1911A2
    ... but for example the sear: it must interface correctly with the hammer hooks (flatly, for the primary and secondary angle), ...
    Secondary angle? The secondary angle isn't required for safe or proper function, it's something that modern gunsmiths have come up with to improve trigger pull. The Ordnance Department blueprints don't call for a relief angle on the sear tip. The specification is "SHARP TO .003 R". That's three THOUSANDTHS of an inch. That's nothing more than breaking the edge so it's not quite as sharp as a good knife.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    9th June 2004
    Location
    Alabama, US
    Posts
    1,728
    Posts liked by others
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by 1911A2 View Post
    The fitting was particular enough that the parts had last of ser number stamped
    You must be thinking about a Luger.
    The only part numbering on an American service pistol was by Colt 1937-1943 and that was only on the slide. A lot of those are found with narrow mismatches, 5 to 20 places, which the collectors say is from Army inspector interchangeability tests. The parts interchanged and the guns worked, so the inspector did not see any reason to match them back up.

    Yes, Argentine 1927s are numbered on barrel and slide and Norwegian 1914s are numbered all over in the European tradition. But that is because they built guns the European way, not the American industrial way.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Sponsors Panel
If you intend to buy something from Brownells, Sinclair or Police Store, please use their banners above. Whatever you buy from them, gives us a small commission, which helps us keep these sites alive. You still pay the normal price, our commission comes from their profit, so you have nothing to lose, while we have something to gain. Your help is appreciated.
If you want to become a sponsor and see your banner in the above panel, click here to contact us.
-->

Non-gun-related supporters.
Thank you for visiting our supporters.