Welcome to M1911.ORG
The M1911 Pistols Organization Forums Site


Sponsors Panel
If you intend to buy something from Brownells, Cabela's, TandemKros or Tekmat, please use their banners in our sites. Whatever you buy from them, gives us a small commission, which helps us keep these sites alive. You still pay the normal price, our commission comes from their profit, so you have nothing to lose, while we have something to gain. Also, don't forget to visit our other sponsors sites, click-throughs are appreciated by our advertisers. Your help is appreciated.
If you want to become a sponsor and see your banner in the above panel, click here to contact us.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 39

Thread: Differences of Series 70 and Series 80 continued......

  1. #21
    Join Date
    21st September 2008
    Posts
    9,433
    Posts liked by others
    69
    As Jim Watson wrote, Colt took it seriously enough to build its pistols with it in the 1930s, before war production caused them to drop it and revert to M1911 specs. Then after the war they didn't rush to reintroduce it but by then, other manufacturers had started using versions of it in other pistol designs.

    My theory (and it's only that, so make of it what you will) is the design came about because engineers hated the fact that handguns had gained a reputation of firing when dropped. The idea was so strong that it became part of Hollywood galore, even before Mr. Bond dropped his PPK/S off a roof in the Bahamas.

    Lawyers and irresponsible millennials came much later.
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  2. #22
    Join Date
    2nd June 2004
    Location
    Terra
    Posts
    20,523
    Posts liked by others
    140
    You mean like the scene from True Lies?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBIrQV9PxHg
    Hawkmoon
    On a good day, can hit the broad side of a barn ... from the inside

  3. #23
    Join Date
    21st September 2008
    Posts
    9,433
    Posts liked by others
    69
    Nice. At least this Uzi seems to recoil a bit more than Bond's PPK!
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  4. #24
    Join Date
    9th June 2004
    Location
    Alabama, US
    Posts
    1,742
    Posts liked by others
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by Spyros View Post
    It's probably worth mentioning at this point that the first firing pin safety systems appeared in the 1930s. Before Glocks, litigious lawyers, etc.
    I once read an article on the development of the P38. There was a prototype that had a super safe action. There was no way that gun was going to go off except by pulling the trigger all the way through. But, if anything went wrong with the super safe lockwork, the gun would not go off when the trigger was pulled, either. The General Staff told Walther to fix that and the production model P38s' firing pin safeties would fail in the fire position.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    10th July 2016
    Posts
    39
    Posts liked by others
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Spyros View Post
    My theory (and it's only that, so make of it what you will) is the design came about because engineers hated the fact that handguns had gained a reputation of firing when dropped. The idea was so strong that it became part of Hollywood galore, even before Mr. Bond dropped his PPK/S off a roof in the Bahamas. Lawyers and irresponsible millennials came much later.
    Well of course, anything that happens in a Hollywood movie happens ALL THE TIME in real life, LOL.

    Having spent thirty years in engineering, I can assure you, the engineers didn't come up with the idea on their own. Things like this don't get designed unless forced by marketing or legal. Irresponsible lawyering has been around as long as there have been lawyers. It was probably ALLEGED in court that a gun fired when dropped, a jury of mush-brains bought it, the gun company lawyers demanded the engineers design a safer gun, and the rest is history.

    Do you really think the "safety" features on your lawn mower were put there because the engineers were afraid someone would back over their 18 month old kid? No, we're smart enough to use a mower correctly and have a difficult time thinking of all the stupid ways someone can mis-use a product. Safety features for the most part, are a result of legal action because someone actually, or allegedly, misused a product and it was the fault of the evil company engineers that someone got hurt.
    Last edited by kc2bya; 17th March 2017 at 10:02.


  6. #26
    Join Date
    21st September 2008
    Posts
    9,433
    Posts liked by others
    69
    Quote Originally Posted by kc2bya View Post
    Well of course, anything that happens in a Hollywood movie happens ALL THE TIME in real life, LOL.
    That's not what I argued. I wrote that handguns gained the reputation (probably wrongly), then Hollywood decided to mention it.

    I'm not sure about the features you mention on lawn mowers, probably because all three of mine are walk-behinds.
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  7. #27
    Join Date
    10th July 2016
    Posts
    39
    Posts liked by others
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Spyros View Post
    That's not what I argued. I wrote that handguns gained the reputation (probably wrongly), then Hollywood decided to mention it.

    I'm not sure about the features you mention on lawn mowers, probably because all three of mine are walk-behinds.
    My point is that most things you see in movies DON'T happen in real life, including guns going off when dropped, except under the most controlled of scenarios, designed specifically to MAKE the gun go off when dropped, something that would happen in real life with such extreme improbability that it's not even worth mentioning. This is where bad lawyering has brought us, and it hasn't just been a product of the 21st century.

    Walk-behind mowers had for many years a bale on the handle that had to be squeezed to keep the motor running, a direct result of some idiot that tried to clean grass and debris from the chute with the blade running, quickly removing his fingers. A roll of duct tape usually defeated that one so I think they gave up on that. When I was at Tecumseh we, along with Sears, were sued by an idiot that backed over his 18 month old kid with a rider. Now all riders sold in America have a feature that disables the blade, if not the motor, when put in reverse.

    Just because a lawyer argues in court that something CAN happen doesn't mean it DID happen. Reasonable doubt is all they need to prove. But that doesn't stop the corporate lawyers from packing the work schedule of the engineering departments with projects that are rarely if ever needed in real life. Letting my evil side out, I'd say we're breeding a society of morons by making things TOO safe. Survival of the fittest?
    Last edited by kc2bya; 17th March 2017 at 11:19.


  8. #28
    Join Date
    28th January 2006
    Location
    The Great American Desert
    Posts
    4,639
    Posts liked by others
    50
    If one looks at the mechanical firing pin safeties that exist on 1911s that I am aware of the Colt Series 80 is probably the best. In field stripping and reassembly the little lever which can be damaged if raised when the slide is forcibly rammed on is raised by pulling the trigger is probably less prone to damage than the Kimber pin which is raised by pressing the grip safety or the S&W lever which is also raised by pressing the grip safety. Below a "series 70" slide on the left, then a Colt Series 80. Then a Kimber slide and on the right a S&W slide. The Kimber system is heavily based on the old Colt Swartz system from the 1930s and the S&W system was developed by S&W.



    Also on the Kimber system one has to remove the rear sight to replace the plunger spring. Probably one of several reasons the Series 80 system is the one that is most used. Not only by Colt but also Para, Remington, SIG, Taurus, and probably others.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    21st September 2008
    Posts
    9,433
    Posts liked by others
    69
    Quote Originally Posted by kc2bya View Post
    Walk-behind mowers had for many years a bale on the handle that had to be squeezed to keep the motor running, a direct result of some idiot that tried to clean grass and debris from the chute with the blade running, quickly removing his fingers. A roll of duct tape usually defeated that one so I think they gave up on that.
    If you tape it up with duct tape, how are you going to switch off the engine?

    I've never seen a push mower that didn't have a handle like you describe. Not that it matters, because keeping this handle pressed AND reaching down under the mower IS possible. Yes, I've tried it -- with the engine off.
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

  10. #30
    Join Date
    21st September 2008
    Posts
    9,433
    Posts liked by others
    69
    Quote Originally Posted by dakota1911 View Post
    Not only by Colt but also Para, Remington, SIG, Taurus, and probably others.
    You can add Auto-Ordnance on this list. Also, the Turkish Tisas had it on some early Regent models (those sold by Umarex).
    Too many people miss the silver lining because they're expecting gold.
    M. Setter

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Sponsors Panel
If you intend to buy something from Brownells, Sinclair or Police Store, please use their banners above. Whatever you buy from them, gives us a small commission, which helps us keep these sites alive. You still pay the normal price, our commission comes from their profit, so you have nothing to lose, while we have something to gain. Your help is appreciated.
If you want to become a sponsor and see your banner in the above panel, click here to contact us.
-->

Non-gun-related supporters.
Thank you for visiting our supporters.