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markhait
23rd December 2008, 06:58
A friend at work just got a pistol from his dad when he passed away.
On the slide it says 11.25 mm Aut Pistol M 1914.

It would appear to be Norweagean.
The serial number is 26616

Any help would be appreciated!

Scott Gahimer
23rd December 2008, 18:12
Sounds like you are on the right track. Definitely sounds like an M1914 Norwegian.

All the numbers should match throughout the pistol. Post some good photos when you can, and provide more specific details. Then, if you have specific questions, we might have some specific answers.

wjkuleck
23rd December 2008, 18:24
You may find a manufacture date on it. As Scott indicated, it is indeed a Colt-licensed Norwegian M1914. These were made in Norway right through WWII.

Regards,

Walt

bgiven
24th December 2008, 10:42
Serial number indicates 1942 manufature at Kongsberg. The slide should be marked on the RH side '1942' just in front of the serrations. As Scott has already mentioned, most components will be marked with the last 3 digits of the serial number, including the barrel. Pictures will certainly help.

Sgt. Quincannon
24th December 2008, 13:52
PLEASE..... post some pictures. I had a chance to buy a Norwegian dirt cheap about 25 years ago, and I passed on it. That pistol would easily be worth 10 times the price the seller wanted in 1984. DURN, DURN, DURN!!!

markhait
24th December 2008, 23:25
I wont be able to post pictures for a few weeks. We're on Christmas break for the next 2 weeks. I will certainly have him take some pics of the pistol once I get back to work.
He did tell me that his father bought it from a guy in Georgia back in the 60's for $69.00
The finish isn't original, as he didn't store it properly and it got all messed up. My friend sent it to a gunsmith and he re-finished it for him many years ago.

markhait
7th January 2009, 15:30
I finally took some pics of the pistol.
Please let me know anything about this pistol.
Important is year of manufacture and approximate worth.
The finish IS NOT original.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v674/markhait/1.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v674/markhait/2.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v674/markhait/3.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v674/markhait/4.jpg

wjkuleck
7th January 2009, 16:03
It's a Norwegian M1914, the licensed production M1911A1 manufactured at Kongsberg Arsenal in Sweden. The date would seem to be 1942, during the Nazi occupation. One would expect to see the date on the right side of the slide, with the initials of the Kongsberg Kontrolloffiser "JB" under the date. There seems to be the vestige of something there.

Regards,

Walt

Scott Gahimer
7th January 2009, 17:59
Norwegian M1914 pistols are not M1911A1 configuration. They do not have an arched mainspring housing, finger cutouts in the frame, short trgger and extended grip safety, or other characteristics of the USGI M1911A1. They even have double diamond grip panels like the M1911 pistols.

Last time I checked, Kongsberg was still in Norway.

markhait
7th January 2009, 19:48
There is a date on the right side of the slide, but all that is visible is 19.
If you look under a magnifying glass you can see that someone filed it down.
Any idea of what its worth?
Its a friends at work and he doesn't know if he should sell it because of its value, or just shoot it because its not worth much.

mayagrafix
7th January 2009, 20:11
There aren't that many Norwegian M1914 pistols to begin with... and this one has been re-blued so premium collectors value is Kaput. IMHO I say this is a candidate for restoration and somebody's collection; also I would recommend to your friend to avoid shooting it so he wont end up with a bunch of M1914 parts. With what he can sell it for he can buy a brand new 45 ACP and shoot it as much as he wants to.

Balder
9th January 2009, 15:27
26616 was in a batch of 150 pistols delivered from Kongsberg Våpenfabrikk to ArmeeOberkommando Norwegen (AOK) on February 2 1942. The M/1914 is a direct copy of the M1911 apart from the modified slide stop lever. The M1911A1 didn't come about until the 1920's (1926?)

Balder

markhait
9th January 2009, 15:40
Thanks for all the info...keep it coming!
Would this be a safe gun to shoot?
Also...can anyone give me a ball park figure about how much it is worth?

mayagrafix
10th January 2009, 11:45
Thanks for all the info...keep it coming!
Would this be a safe gun to shoot?
Also...can anyone give me a ball park figure about how much it is worth?
Think of it as if you had a 1920 Volvo ÖV 4 (the first car built by them). A collectors item. Would you drive it to the supermarket everyday? knowing that just one accident would ruin it forever?

If you just want to practice your marksmanship, trade it for a modern (or maybe two) pistols :D

Balder
10th January 2009, 15:57
mayagrafix,

I would certainly not drive it to the supermarket every day, but I would definitely take it for a spin every now and then. That's also my philosophy when it comes to my gun collection (some 50+ pieces); they all go to the range once in a blue moon.

Balder

markhait
11th January 2009, 08:19
My friend at work doesn't have any children and so no one the give it to when he dies.
I'm kind of urging him to sell it to a collector before something happens to it.
Its a wonderful piece of history and something I wish I could will to my children, although I'm not interested in it, I'd like someone who collects to enjoy it.

My friends dad kind of threatened him that if he sold it though, he'd haunt him forever!
My friend is a tough guy, but he's taking his dads threat seriously though. Kind of funny, but I understand.

If he was to sell it. How would you go about finding a seller for it? What could I tell him to reasonably expect from the sale? I mean, is this a $600 gun or is it more like $2000 gun?
Since it was re-blued, would you bother trying to re-store the original finish or just let a collector do it, if he was to sell?
He even has an original colt conversion kit for it to shoot .22! Box and everything. I've scanned gunbroker.com and those are selling for $1000!

Pretty neat!

Tom
11th January 2009, 10:23
Since it was re-blued, would you bother trying to re-store the original finish or just let a collector do it, if he was to sell?
I'm far from being an expert, but I think that given the fact that the pistol has already been altered as far as the finish goes, the "collector's value" has already taken a hit, and there's really no point in trying to "restore" the finish. The damage has been done, and any further attempts to correct or restore won't change that. In the coin collecting world, a battered, dirty, tarnished coin will fetch a higher premium than the same coin that has been cleaned. I believe gun collectors feel the same way.

But like I said, I could be wrong. Maybe a restoration is possible and can restore the pistol's value. But if so, then the next question would be at what cost. Would the restoration be cost prohibitive. I dunno.

mayagrafix
11th January 2009, 16:45
mayagrafix,

I would certainly not drive it to the supermarket every day, but I would definitely take it for a spin every now and then. That's also my philosophy when it comes to my gun collection (some 50+ pieces); they all go to the range once in a blue moon.

Balder
That is a good way of thinking, nothing wrong with taking the "girls" out for a spin once in while. But one has to be aware that putting 500 or more rounds in a day of target practice is above and beyond the practical and safe for a 50 plus year old firearm. One or two magazines OK, 10 boxes of ammo is taking a chance.

Some weapons are for target practice and defense, some are for looking IMO.

Mentor
10th February 2009, 16:29
I am working on Kongberg Small Arms as, a company that have taken over the small arms production at Kongsberg an can give You the following information.

S.N 26616 was prodused and delivered from Kongsberg Vaapenfabrikk to the german AOK Norwegen (German Army High Command, Norway) on the 2. February 1942 in a lot of 150ea. M1914.

markhait
10th February 2009, 17:44
Hey Mentor
Thanks for the info. I'm sure my co-worker will be much grateful!