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View Full Version : Made in BRAZIL? PX9130L 9MM 1911



myjarreth
4th August 2006, 11:19
I was just sick to find "made in Brazil" stamped just in front of the trigger guard on the frame. My fault for not doing more research. It's definitely not advertised on their website. I would have never bought a Springfield If I had known. At the very least it could just been stamped under the grip so as not to remind me daily how stupid I was (there is another stamp under the grip). I haven't shot it yet. I really just want to get rid of it, But I'd probably take a bath on the price.

vomiting in PA.

Joni Lynn
4th August 2006, 11:43
All the Springfield Armory 1911's are made there.......on some of them, final assembly is completed here. If the gun was completed there it says what yours does, if it's final assembly was here it won't have that stamping that you find objectionable.
I'm not certain but it might be that guns with an NM serial number prefix have their final assembly completed here and the N prefix are not.

Hacker
4th August 2006, 11:49
What's the problem? Your money went to a US company that employs US workers. They sub-contract out some of the basic forging and manufacturing to IMBEL in Brazil. The pistol you have is well made, accurate, and will last.

I'd be glad to pay a ridiculously low price if you really are that disturbed.

:)

iamdman
4th August 2006, 17:58
If you really want to get rid of it, just pm me. You've got a quality piece there. Besides a lot of other manufacturers frames/slides come from imbel or other non-US countries.

Captain America
4th August 2006, 18:00
You have nothing to worry about. Do a Google search on IMBEL(Industria de Material
Belico do Brasil) and you will find that your pistol was manufactured by a modern
weapons manufacturing plant that has been in business for a long time and has
produced some of the finest military weapons on the planet. IMBEL has a sterling
reputation. Springfield Armory would not do business with them if that were not true.
There products are equal to or better than any weapons maker with the exception
of Heckler and Koch in Germany. You have a fine weapon. Enjoy it.

harleydog
4th August 2006, 18:09
You have nothing to worry about with the Springfield. It will shoot with the best of them.

pa_guns
4th August 2006, 21:01
Hi

The Brazil connection goes back as long as Springfield has been making 1911's. We went through a whole bunch of stuff trying to find a point they were not made in Brazil and could not.

There's nothing at all wrong with the way the Springfields are made. I actually think it's good to know who makes what. Most pistols these days are made from parts "sourced" outside the assembly company. Other manufacturers don't identify their sources and when they decide to switch vendors the performance of their end product changes ....

Bob

AKsRule
4th August 2006, 22:24
I was just sick to find "made in Brazil" stamped just in front of the trigger guard on the frame. My fault for not doing more research. It's definitely not advertised on their website. I would have never bought a Springfield If I had known. At the very least it could just been stamped under the grip so as not to remind me daily how stupid I was (there is another stamp under the grip). I haven't shot it yet. I really just want to get rid of it, But I'd probably take a bath on the price.

vomiting in PA.


Maybe if you stomp on it REAL HARD with your Gucci Loafers you will
Feel better :p

gottripletsNC
4th August 2006, 22:31
I'm quite sure that if you really wanna get rid of it that you can get most of your money back, SA's are good guns, won't have any problems gettin rid of it, oh by the way, if you are really concerned about buying US, you need to investigate really closely because most frames and slides are from only a few manufacturers. I don't know who buys from who, but only a couple or three from what I understand do the forgings, and sell to multiple other organizations, so you may wanna check into that first. Who knows, when you think you have found an American manufacturer, the frame and slide could very well have been forged overseas.

pa_guns
4th August 2006, 23:08
Hi

My best guess for a US made 1911 would be Smith and Wesson. Second bet would be a Colt. It would be very hard to confirm either one down through the raw blanks though. If you start poking around in the over $2000 range there are people who will do the pistol from raw metal. I'd say that's about the only way to be *sure* of where it came from.

Clot and SW 1911's have a lot of appeal. They are both good pistols, but I would not buy them over a Springfield simply because of where they are made. I can think of other reasons, but that's definitely not one of them.

Bob

John
5th August 2006, 03:34
What's wrong with that? I mean if that pistol was made in US, it would cost you more. Are you willing to pay the additional $$$ for not having that stamp there?

pa_guns
5th August 2006, 10:47
Hi

This is the second or third "made in Brazil" thread in the last couple of weeks. We seem to pretty much respond the same way to each of them. I see very few people coming out saying we should not send money to Brazil.

I suspect the response might be a little different if we were talking about mainland China, but maybe not.

Bob

raveneap
5th August 2006, 10:52
Your SA is an excellent weapon in workmanship, usability and overall quality. If you find it that objectionable, as has already been said, you should have no problem getting rid of it. Good luck in finding anything made 100% in the USA.

John
5th August 2006, 12:53
Steady gentlemen, let's make sure we do not divert into political/national discussions.

harleydog
5th August 2006, 17:20
myjarreth,
Have you gotten over the brazil stamp yet. There really is nothing wrong with the SA. Just shot the snot out of it and dont look back.

mossy500
5th August 2006, 18:16
Gentlemen,

One of the reason why they send the job to brazil is because the labor is cheaper and shipping cost is better if ship to mainland china to do the job.

Now if you have cheaper labor then you also get cheaper quality of work
meaning you get what you paid.

So bottom line minimize production cost and maximize profit and end users suffer the quality of the product very true if you think it practically.

If there is no comparison on guns made in brazil this is the best guns among the worst.

Prefer to have the gun assemble in USA they are more engineered than other
competitors. I mean mostly on 1911.

concerned shooter//

Captain America
5th August 2006, 18:40
Dear selanroj:
You are one of the many babes lost in the woods. The reason Springfield Armory
farms out some of the manufacturing is so they can produce a quality product. Cheap
labor DOES NOT indicate an inferior product. Where in the world did that concept come from? Investigate IMBEL and you will find that Springfield Armory realized that
IMBEL could produce 1911 frames and slides not only cheaper but BETTER than they
ever could. Take that to the bank. Because Springfield Armory chose to use IMBEL
indicates their desire to produce a quality product.

pa_guns
5th August 2006, 19:06
Hi

Ok, this thread really is getting off into an area that there is no reason to go.

Like it or not the 1911 *design* has been made for a number of years. It has been made by a lot of companies in a lot of countries. The design works, and it (the engineering) was pretty much worked out a long time ago. When the pistol is made by somebody or the other in some place previously unheard of it's still the same design. The design was done by a guy named John Browning. A great guy, but he's been dead for a while now.

What it takes to execute the design also is not a big secret. All of the standards for producing an excellent 1911 pattern pistol are out in the public domain for everybody to read. There is no "secret sauce" or "magic formula". The US War Department / DOD / Who Ever didn't keep those kind of secrets. This pistol was made in *volume* for war time use. That equals public information. Any well stocked library at a good university has *all* the information and a Xerox machine.

The technology needed to execute the 1911 design is not a big deal. A source of raw material, and some machine tools will do very nicely. It's 1920's technology at best. Most of it is, well 1890's technology. You can (and do) support this kind of thing in any country on the face of the earth. If they can rebuild disk brakes they can make 1911's.

Does nothing matter on a 1911? Of course not. You need a commitment to quality. If you have that then you can make good pistols. People who are not committed to quality (in any country) make junk and go out of business.

Here's the only data that matters - Springfield has been making these little goodies for nearly 30 years now. They make them the same way they always have. People have put tens, and hundreds of thousands of rounds through the pistols. THEY WORK and they work every bit as well as the best made anywhere else in the world.

Bob

whitey019
5th August 2006, 21:23
There are plenty of 1911s made and assembled in the USA; Colt , Kimber, STI, Ed Brown, Wilson Combat, Les Baer, Auto Ordnance, Detonics, S&W, SVI Nightwawk, Rock River and Dan Wesson (although DW is now owned by CZ). Some are expensive, some are the same as a Springfield and there are probably more, but that's all I can think of at the moment.

Bluey
6th August 2006, 00:25
G'day, myjarreth, well, I'm an Aussie myself and I happen to own a Springfield 1911 in 9mm, just like yours. It even bears 'Made in Brazil' stamp but it doesn't bother me at all as it is a fantastic pistol to shoot. Very well-made, absolutely reliable, no mal-functions so far after 1000+ rounds and accurate enough for the competitions I shoot in. My dad really loves it to bits and wants one too, so, if you're still wanting to get rid of the Springer, I can give it a loving home :D

raveneap
6th August 2006, 14:11
Took my SA out this AM and as usual, no surprises. Devoured anything I chose to feed it and never a hiccup. Same as my CZ 85B. Same as a couple of revolvers I dusted off and played with; a S&W 587 and a Ruger Speed Six. All quality guns; some old, some new, some USA, some not. All fun, well made and great shooters.

larry starling
6th August 2006, 16:13
I was just sick to find "made in Brazil" stamped just in front of the trigger guard on the frame. My fault for not doing more research. It's definitely not advertised on their website. I would have never bought a Springfield If I had known. At the very least it could just been stamped under the grip so as not to remind me daily how stupid I was (there is another stamp under the grip). I haven't shot it yet. I really just want to get rid of it, But I'd probably take a bath on the price.

vomiting in PA.
Well unless your buying a COLT or a Mimber there all pretty much made overseas.... :D

Joni Lynn
6th August 2006, 16:19
Actually there's a lot of them made right here in the US. S&W, Rock River Arms, Wilson, NightHawk, Les Baer, Ed Brown, Caspian, STI/SVI.

Mick_In_Texas
7th August 2006, 20:26
Most of y'all know about my experiences with the first firearm I've owned or currently own that I named: "Ol' Reliable", a Springfield Armory (my first) Mil-Spec, stainless steel, .45 caliber... and with the etchings about Made in Brazil and Imbel.

At first, I was very upset, associating the name Springfield Armory with the old, original United States Governement Springfield Armory--two different things, and being upset that my first 1911 was not made in America.

Proof is in the shooting though: Out of the box, only oiled it a little prior to first shot, NO breakin required--100% on factory ammo, all-FMJ Wolf mag, all-FMJ Winchester mag, all-SJHP Winchter mag, all mixed mags, any combination. On the range that day, there were at least 9 other other brand .45s--some high end, one hand-built--some of the brands made in the United States. EVERY ONE of those FTF'd or stovepiped an ejection, at least once, most more... One problem, those guys I was shooting with love to reload ammo. NONE of theirs was out of the box. None of mine, wasn't. BUT: that day, the comment was, "How come it is, YOU are the only one who ever has reliable guns?" (the other being my old Ruger P90.) So far, this one's never failed to feed, empty a mag with no stovepipe ejections, and kick open wanting another clip.

ALL the guns I'ved owned or own have been excellent: 1 S & W revolver; 2 Beretta (Italian-mfg) pistols; an AMT backup pistol; 1 Taurus pistol (every bit as 100% as my two 100% Italian Berettas); a Ruger GP100 revolver; a Rock Island Armory 1911A1; a Colt USGI 1911 WWI issue (THAT one, definitely made in the U.S.! LOL), and the aforemention Springer. I've had one problem with any of them. Ever. I do keep mine clean and well-maintained.

I've got another Springer on the way as we type. Every company occasionally produces a "lemon"-bad one off the lines--and for those who get a product that won't PERFORM its intended use, for that individual, bad feelings toward the producer. But, on the Imbel stamping, the Made in Brazil... If you like the gun, if it feels good, you might consider giving it an honest test, to see if it works for what it was intended to do: fire bullets reliably in the situations you need it to do that. Reserve full judgement so to speak, until you fire and handle it.

Again, I understand your upset: I had the same issue, and huge disappointment myself, just over a year ago. Some folks, really cannot accept certain things about a particular gun, or brand, and that is personal preference. But, as some have mentioned, for the price, most of the time, if you can get an SA, they're worth the price. I do not have and probably will never have the money for a Kimber Raptor (oh, my, I LOVE the look of that one!), an Ed Brown, or a Wilson Combat; but, I wouldn't turn one down, either, to ADD to my current collection. My buddy likes Kahr/Auto Ordinace/Thompsons and Colts; next one of mine may be a Colt modern version.

But, if you're willing to give it a chance... myjarreth... you might try it.

Just some experiences and thoughts from someone who has felt the same way initially.

Y'all all take care and be safe.
Mick

myjarreth
7th August 2006, 22:38
Well I took my Brazilian Springfield 1911 9mm with fixed sights to the range and 250 round later, I just hand a whole bunch of targets with holes in and around the middle. No problems what so ever. I do not like the two piece guide rod (even though it makes it easier to dismantle). I need to get some thin grips and checker the front and back straps. Otherwise it's a perfect range gun. My wrist doesn't ache either, ( I am a one handed shooter due to a birth defect.) I will live with the "made in brazil" and I am thankful to find one with fixed sights. I looked for months. REal smooth shooter.

Does anyone know if I could just drop in a stubby spring guide and spring cap from Les Baer into this 1911 9mm?

I own a Les Baer TRS, colt officer's 45, Sig 225, Ruger sp101. My TRS spoils me.

Mick_In_Texas
8th August 2006, 19:27
Well I took my Brazilian Springfield 1911 9mm with fixed sights to the range and 250 round later, I just hand a whole bunch of targets with holes in and around the middle. No problems what so ever. I do not like the two piece guide rod (even though it makes it easier to dismantle). I need to get some thin grips and checker the front and back straps. Otherwise it's a perfect range gun. My wrist doesn't ache either, ( I am a one handed shooter due to a birth defect.) I will live with the "made in brazil" and I am thankful to find one with fixed sights. I looked for months. REal smooth shooter.

Does anyone know if I could just drop in a stubby spring guide and spring cap from Les Baer into this 1911 9mm?

I own a Les Baer TRS, colt officer's 45, Sig 225, Ruger sp101. My TRS spoils me.

I am so pleased that you gave your Springer a "shot" (or about 250 shots, LoL), and were well-pleased with its performance! That is wonderful to hear that you're a little more pleased with your investment, now...

Check some of the after market folks, like Ed Brown (I'll be putting a new Brown flat mainspring housing on my Springer tonight, ss with the snakeskin checkering), Wilson Combat, many others... John has many listed on the main page... and you can find either a full-length 1-pc guide rod, or the "regular" "half" guide rod. Can't advise on interchangeability on specifics, but, the Brown MSH isn't having any trouble fitting my Mil-Spec frame like a glove, looks like...

Good luck on the new one! You have a FINE collection of firearms there. Fine collection.

You and yours take care and be safe.
Mick

John
9th August 2006, 00:55
Does anyone know if I could just drop in a stubby spring guide and spring cap from Les Baer into this 1911 9mm?

These are two parts that I've found to be really drop-in. Althought there are chances that you might need to take a file to the guide rod plate, this is something very rare.

TonyT
11th August 2006, 13:22
I was just sick to find "made in Brazil" stamped just in front of the trigger guard on the frame. My fault for not doing more research. It's definitely not advertised on their website. I would have never bought a Springfield If I had known. At the very least it could just been stamped under the grip so as not to remind me daily how stupid I was (there is another stamp under the grip). I haven't shot it yet. I really just want to get rid of it, But I'd probably take a bath on the price.

vomiting in PA.
What would you have thought if you purchased one of the SIG 1911 typoes, supposedly made in USA, and had all the problems they exhibit? The SA 1911's are well made guns by a manyfacturer whose customer service group supports their product.

Joni Lynn
11th August 2006, 14:13
I expect the companies just imtroducing to have something in the way of a problem, but not to any great extent. That's why I don't buy a new product the first year it's introduced. SA has been doing the 1911 long enough to have it down pretty well.